Child Development: A Thematic Approach

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Houghton Mifflin, 2004 - Child development - 605 pages
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"Child Development" covers all ages through adolescence, focusing on a distinct domain of developmental psychology in every chapter and emphasizing theory and research. In order to help students think like researchers, the authors present a thematic approach that consistently ties findings to the six themes underlying the study of human development--the role of nature and nurture; the influence of sociocultural context; the active role of the child; continuous vs. stage-like development; the interaction of various domains of development; and the prominence of individual differences in development.

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Contents

Themes and Theories
1
What Is Development?
3
Learning Theory Approaches
17
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Danuta (Diane) Bukatko (Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst) is Professor of Psychology and currently holds the Joseph H. Maguire Professorship in Education at Holy Cross College. She has a long-standing interest in cognitive and gender-role development in children, as well as the teaching of psychology. Her current research focuses on children's understanding of gender and power.

Marvin W. Daehler is Emeritus Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He is a Fellow in Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association as well as a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. He has been Associate Editor for the journal CHILD DEVELOPMENT and the MONOGRAPHS OF THE SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT, a reviewer for research articles submitted to numerous other developmental publications, and has served on grant review panels for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Department of Education. He has also served as Associate Chair, Director of Graduate Studies, and Director of Undergraduate Studies for various periods while a member of the Department of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts. His research activities, supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, have been concerned with understanding the development of basic representational abilities, memory, and transfer in problem solving in very young children.

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