Children as Victims, Witnesses, and Offenders: Psychological Science and the Law

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Bette L. Bottoms, Cynthia J. Najdowski, Gail S. Goodman
Guilford Press, Aug 10, 2009 - Psychology - 412 pages
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Grounded in the latest clinical and developmental knowledge, this book brings together leading authorities to examine the critical issues that arise when children and adolescents become involved in the justice system. Chapters explore young people’s capacities, competencies, and special vulnerabilities as victims, witnesses, and defendants. Key topics include the reliability of children’s abuse disclosures, eyewitness testimony, interviews, and confessions; the evolving role of the expert witness; the psychological impact of trauma and of legal involvement; factors that shape jurors’ perceptions of children; and what works in rehabilitating juvenile offenders. Policies and practices that are not supported by science are identified, and approaches to improving them are discussed.

 

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Contents

Chapter 1
1
Chapter 2
19
Chapter 3
36
Chapter 4
57
Chapter 5
81
Chapter 6
102
Chapter 7
128
Chapter 8
150
Chapter 12
233
Chapter 13
255
Chapter 14
275
Chapter 15
295
Chapter 16
313
Chapter 17
334
Chapter 18
349
Chapter 19
369

Chapter 9
167
Chapter 10
188
Chapter 11
209
Chapter 20
385
index
403
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About the author (2009)

Bette L. Bottoms, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She has edited four other books and published numerous articles about child abuse, children's eyewitness testimony, and jurors' perceptions of child victims and offenders. A past president of the American Psychological Association's Society for Child and Family Policy and Practice, she is a recipient of the American Psychology-Law Society Early Career Award and eight awards for teaching excellence.

 

Cynthia J. Najdowski, BA, is a doctoral student in social and personality psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her research focuses on understanding how childhood sexual abuse and rape victims cope with their experiences. She also studies perceptions of juvenile offenders. She has received several competitive grants and awards in recognition of her work.

 

Gail S. Goodman, PhD, is Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Director of the Center for Public Policy Research at the University of California, Davis. She has received numerous awards and federal grants for research, and her studies have been cited in U.S. Supreme Court decisions. Her psycholegal research focuses on child maltreatment, trauma and memory, forensic interviewing, and juvenile delinquency.  

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