Children, Childhood and English Society, 1880-1990

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 9, 1997 - History - 114 pages
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This book is intended to be a guide to the burgeoning literature on the history of childhood. Harry Hendrick reviews the most important debates and main findings of a number of historians on a range of topics including the changing social constructions of childhood, child-parent relations, social policy, schooling, leisure and the thesis that modern childhood is "disappearing." The intention of this concise study is to provide readers with a reliable account of the evolution of some of the most important developments in adult-child relations during the past one hundred years. The author draws his material not only from historians but also from sociologists, anthropologists, psychologists and children's rights activists.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
New ideas of childhood the 1880s to the 1920s
9
Parentchild relationships
16
Children and social policies
36
Children schooling and the classroom
63
Childrens leisure
79
Conclusion disappearing childhood and childrens rights?
94
Bibliography
100
Index
112
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