Children of the Fire

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Demco Media, Jan 1, 2001 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 134 pages
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By the winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for historical fiction, this middle-grade novel is the perfect curriculum tie-in for classroom discussions about disasters and 19th century America. Eleven-year-old Hallelujah is intrigued by the fires that are starting up all over Chicago in 1877--but what she doesn't realize is that it is the Great Fire and her life will be irrevocably changed.

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Contents

Section 1
10
Section 2
17
Section 3
26
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Harriette Gillem Robinet, a Washington, D.C., native, graduated from the College of New Rochelle, New York, and from graduate studies at Catholic University in Washington, D.C. She is a member of the National Writers Union.

Robinet felt compelled to write the story of the labor struggle for the eight-hour day. In Chicago, emotions still boil over the Haymarket tragedy, and year-round wreaths are placed at the Haymarket Monument. She was proud to be present when that monument was made a national memorial.

She and her husband, McLouis Robinet, live in Oak Park, Illinois, and have six children and four grandchildren.

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