Children's Stories of American Progress

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1902 - 333 pages
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Page 23 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it; I have killed many; I have fully glutted my vengeance: for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 334 - Stories of American Progress * contain a series of pictures of events of the first half of the present century, and the scope of the book comprehends all the prominent steps by which we have reached our present position both as regards extent of country and industrial prosperity. They include an account of the first Steamboat, the Railroad, and the Telegraph, as well as of the Purchase of Florida, the War of 1812...
Page 336 - CHILDREN'S STORIES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. Illustrated. I2mo, $1.25. " A most delightful and instructive collection of historical events, told in a simple and pleasant manner. Almost every occurrence in the gradual development of our country is woven into an attractive story for young people.
Page 335 - Wright's two previous books which have attained such popularity as supplementary readers. It deals, in a simple, entertaining manner, with sixteen of the great men of science, giving a brief, readable account of their lives and of what discoveries they made.
Page 148 - The town is fortified with an entrenchment, salient angles, and redoubts, which inclose about half a mile in length, and a quarter of a mile in width.
Page 336 - Miss Wright is favorably known by her volume of well-told 'Stories in American History,* and her ' Stories of American Progress ' is equally worthy of commendation. Taken together they present a series of pictures of great graphic interest. The illustrations are excellent.
Page 334 - The * Stories of American Progress * contain a series of pictures of events of the first half of the present century, and the scope of the book comprehends all the prominent steps by which we have reached our present position both as regards extent of country and industrial prosperity. They include an account of the first Steamboat, the Railroad, and the Telegraph, as well as of the Purchase of Florida, the War of 1812, and the Discovery of Gold. It will be found that no event of importance has been...
Page 183 - ... excavated to a depth of more than sixty feet, there are embankments to be made nearly to the same height, there is a swamp of five miles in length to be traversed, in which if you drop an iron rod it sinks and disappears: how will you do all this?' and receiving no answer but a broad Northumbrian 'I can't tell you how I'll do it, but I can tell you I will do it,' dismissed Stephenson as a visionary.
Page 53 - ... they have powers almost equal to a minister. Such is the case with consuls within the ports of Mohammedan countries. The word consul was applied to Napoleon [page 387] in the ancient Roman sense. It was the title of the chief magistrate of Rome during the Republic. The treaty made by Lear provided for an exchange of prisoners, man for man, as far as they would go. Jessuff had about two hundred more prisoners than the Americans held, and for these, a ransom of $60,000 was to be paid.
Page 286 - March, 1848, the treaty of peace between Mexico and the United States was signed.

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