China As A Maritime Power

Front Cover
Avalon Publishing, Dec 4, 1983 - History - 277 pages

THE CLASSIC HISTORY OF THE FOUNDING AND EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN CHINA'S MARITIME POWER -- NOW BACK IN PRINT..

Hardly a week passes without headlines about China's use of seapower in the Western Pacific, seapower that presents daunting challenges to the US Navy, Japan's security, international shipping, and offshore oil claims. But it's impossible to understand this change in the Asian balance of power without a grasp of where China's modern seapower came from....

Never superseded in its coverage and analysis of the foundations of modern China's navy, merchant marine, and maritime development, China as a Maritime Power is still the definitive history of this little-known but critically important topic....

Here you will find detailed accounts and analysis of

The Soviet role in building the PRC navy; the effects of the Sino-Soviet split

Narratives of the offshore islands crises of the 1950s

How the PRC navy dealt with the Cultural Revolution and the Lin Biao coup

The PRC navy's role in the Korean and Vietnam wars

The history of PRC claims to vast areas of the East and South China seas

The maritime policy positions of key Chinese political and naval figures

China as a Maritime Power is unique in its use of archives of both declassified US intelligence reports and primary Chinese source materials..

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Contents

Introduction
1
Naval History 19451960
7
Naval Strategy 19491960
44
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

David G. Muller, Jr. graduated in 1970 from Dartmouth College, having majored in Chinese language and history, was commissioned an officer in the US Navy, and assigned to duties in naval intelligence. He received an advanced degree in Asian history and politics from the University of Michigan in 1974. He served on sea duty in the Atlantic and Mediterranean theaters, and aboard a frigate of the Royal Australian Navy. Muller was the senior China analyst for the Commander in Chief of the US Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor, and later the senior China analyst for the Office of Naval Intelligence. Following naval service, Muller continued work as a civilian in agencies of US intelligence. He is now retired and lives in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.

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