China's Security Interests in the Post-Cold War Era

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2002 - Political Science - 227 pages
0 Reviews
This book analyses China's security interests in the post-Cold War era by adopting a broader concept of security. It examines the military, political and economic dimensions of security; and China's reactions to changes in the security environment in Northeast Asia. The book concentrates on the economic and political aspects of China's security agenda, which have, to a certain extent, been given less prominence in most security studies on China. One distinctive feature of the book, therefore, is to add to both academic and policy research more analysis on the economic and political aspects of China's security in the post-Cold War era, examining from a Chinese perspective issues such as the collapse of communism, the alleged western strategy of 'peaceful evolution', and China's economic relations with South Korea, Taiwan, Japan and the United States. The more traditional security issues, such as the diminished Russian threat, North Korea's enduring importance, the rise of Japan, the 'Taiwan Independence' challenge and the perception of American hegemony, are also addressed. It is argued that China seeks comprehensive security in the post-Cold War era, and indeed the concept of secur
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter One The Chinese Concept of Security
12
Chapter Two Implications of the Soviet Collapse
32
Chapter Three The Korean Peninsula
53
Chapter Four The Rise of Japan
76
Chapter Five The Taiwan Issue
96
Chapter Six The Threat of Peaceful Evolution
116
Chapter Seven Perceptions of the United States
136
Chapter Eight The Drive to Great Power Status
158
Conclusion
175
Bibliography
212
Index
226
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information