Chinese Letter

Front Cover
Dalkey Archive Press, 2004 - Fiction - 132 pages
1 Review

Ordered by two mysterious men to write a statement of about 100 pages, the narrator of Chinese Letter--who's not sure of his name, but calls himself Fritz--faithfully records the bizarre occurrences of his daily life: his absurd conversations with his mother who is abducted by slave traders, his visits to his friend who works in the hospital's autopsy room, and his sister's tumultuous marriage to the butcher's son, to name a few. Widely respected in Serbia, the term "Basarian" has been coined to refer to his unique writing style, reminiscent of the best of Samuel Beckett for its directness, existential pondering, and odd sense of humor.

 

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Chinese Letter (Eastern European Literature Series)

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The narrator of Basara's 1984 comedic novel describes daily life with his oddball family and visits to friends, including one who is a morgue attendant. The story unfurls in words and doodles. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
9
Section 3
18
Section 4
33
Section 5
49
Section 6
65
Section 7
74
Section 8
82
Section 9
101
Section 10
105
Section 11
110
Section 12
121
Section 13
138
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About the author (2004)

Svetislav Basara, born in 1953, is a major figure in Serbian and Eastern European literature. He is the author of more than twenty literary works, including novels, story collections, and essays. He has received numerous literary awards and his novel Fama o biciklistima [The Fuss about Cyclists, 1988] was proclaimed by Serbian literary critics to be one of the ten best novels of the 1980s.

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