Chinese Military Modernization: Force Development and Strategic Capabilities

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CSIS, 2007 - Political Science - 226 pages
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Changing political relationships and a substantial increase in resources have prompted the Chinese leadership to accelerate the modernization of its armed forces. Observers, not least the United States, have wondered what objectives China's military buildup is meant to serve. The Chinese government's extreme secrecy about military budgets, force training, and weapon system procurement leaves considerable room for speculation. Perhaps naturally, China is believed to be preparing capacities for a possible conflict with Taiwan, which might or might not involve the United States. But other developments, like the modernization of strategic nuclear weapons and the acquisition of naval surface combatants, have raised the attention of analysts as to what role the Chinese armed forces will play in China's evolving security policy.This study provides an assessment of the current state of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA). It addresses command structures, doctrine development, military spending, weapon system procurement, and the force structure of all four branches of the PLA. It does so by providing comparisons of current assessments of all aspects of PLA modernization and trend analyses that point out the developments in manpower, spending, and holdings of weapon systems, among others, over the past two decades. Thus, the volume seeks to lay a basis for a meaningful analysis of the role and trajectory of the Chinese military.
 

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Contents

Major Surface Combatants
130
Patrol and Coastal Combatants
131
XXXIX
133
PLAN Marine Forces
134
PLAN Aviation
135
NAVAL MODERNIZATION
136
XL
138
XLI
145

VIII
28
IX
31
X
33
OPERATIONAL COMMAND OF THE CHINESE MILITARY
34
XI
39
PERSONNEL TRENDS
40
XII
43
XIII
44
MILITARY SPENDING
45
XIV
51
XV
53
XVI
54
XVII
55
XVIII
56
MODERNIZATION
57
XIX
60
Uncertain Pattern of Change
61
XX
63
XXII
65
Key Shifts in Naval Systems
66
XXIV
67
XXV
73
PLA GROUND FORCES
74
XXVI
77
NUMBER OF PERSONNEL
78
XXVIII
79
XXIX
86
Armored Forces and Main Battle Tanks
87
XXX
88
XXXI
92
XXXII
95
Artillery
96
XXXIII
97
XXXIV
100
Air Defense Artillery
101
Army Aviation
102
Ballistic Missiles
103
Special Operations Forces
104
XXXV
108
XXXVI
117
PLA NAVY
118
DOCTRINE
119
COMMAND STRUCTURE
120
XXXVII
121
XXXVIII
127
PLA AIR FORCE
146
XLII
151
COMMAND STRUCTURE
152
XLV
153
XLVI
154
XLVII
155
Bombers
156
Fighters and Fighter Attack Systems
157
Reconnaissance
158
Tanker and Transport
159
XLVIII
161
XLIX
167
L
169
LI
174
LII
175
LIII
176
MISSILE FORCES BY CATEGORY
177
LV
179
LVI
183
PARAMILITARY FORCES
184
LVII
187
MILITIA FORCES
188
LVIII
193
LIX
194
LX
195
LXI
204
LXII
205
LXIII
206
LXIV
207
LXV
208
LXVI
209
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
210
LXVII
211
LXVIII
212
LXIX
213
LXX
214
LXXI
215
LXXII
216
LXXIII
217
LXXIV
218
LXXV
219
LXXVI
223
LXXVII
225
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Anthony H. Cordesman holds the Arleigh A. Burke Chair in Strategy at CSIS. He is also a national security analyst for ABC News, a frequent commentator on National Public Radio and the BBC, and the author of more than 45 books on security policy, energy policy, and the Middle East, including Iran's Weapons of Mass Destruction: The Real and Potential Threat (CSIS, 2006). Martin Kleiber is a researcher with the Burke Chair at CSIS. He has worked on security sector reform and nuclear nonproliferation at the German Foreign Office in Bosnia and at the United Nations. He has written on the nuclear nonproliferation regime and Iran, as well as on U.S. foreign and defense policy.

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