The Chinese State at the Borders

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Diana Lary
UBC Press, Nov 1, 2011 - History - 352 pages
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In this ground-breaking study, Hsiao Ting Lin demonstrates that the Chinese frontier was the subject neither of concerted aggression on the part of a centralized and indoctrinated Chinese government nor of an ideologically driven nationalist ethnopolitics. Instead, nationalist sovereignty over Tibet and other border regions was the result of rhetorical grandstanding by Chiang Kai-shek and his regime. Tibet and Nationalist China's Frontier makes a crucial contribution to the understanding of past and present China-Tibet relations. A counterpoint to erroneous historical assumptions, this book will change the way Tibetologists and modern Chinese historians frame future studies of the region.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 The Centre and the Borderlands in Chinese Political Theory
11
2 MingQing Border Defence the Inward Turn of Chinese Cartography and Qing Expansion in Central Asia in the Eighteenth Century
29
3 Marital Politics on the ManchuMongol Frontier in the Early Seventeenth Century
57
4 What Happens When Wang Yangming Crosses the Border?
74
5 Ming China and Its Border with Annam
91
Rewriting the Qing Frontier Campaigns
105
7 Tributary Relations and the QingChoson Frontier on Mount Paektu
126
A SinoFrancoVietnamese Cultural Borderland
162
The GuangxiIndochina Border in the Republican Period
181
Rightists in the Army Farms of Beidahuang
198
The Predicament of Minority Cadres in the PRC
221
13 Theoretical and Conceptual Perspectives on the Periphery in Contemporary China
240
Bibliography
271
Contributors
291
Index
292

As River as Border
151

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About the author (2011)

Diana Lary is a professor of history and director of the Centre of Chinese Research at the Institute of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia. Among her many publications, she is co-editor with Stephen MacKinnon of Scars of War: The Impact of Warfare on Modern China.

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