Chinua Achebe

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 26, 1992 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 199 pages
0 Reviews
This book provides a detailed examination of the writings of Chinua Achebe, Africa's best-known and most widely-read author, shortlisted for the 1987 Booker Prize. Dr Innes studies his writings, lectures and activities chronologically, in the context of Nigerian culture and politics and their interaction with Western cultures and powers. Her analysis goes beyond that of previously published studies, to examine Achebe's short stories, essays and poetry, and his most recent publications, Anthills of the Savannah (1987) and Hopes and Impediments (1988). Particular emphasis is placed on Achebe's departure from European literary models to create a new kind of fiction which seeks to challenge the preconceptions of African and Western audiences alike, and which is of considerable literary and political significance. This study will be invaluable to readers of Achebe and to students and teachers of African literature and politics, and modern fiction.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Acknowledgements
xiii
List of abbreviations
xiv
Chronology
xv
Introduction
1
Origins
4
A less superficial picture Things Fall Apart
21
The best lack all conviction No Longer at Ease
42
Religion and power in Africa Arrow of God
64
The novelist as critic politics and criticism 19601988
102
Marginal lives Girls at War and Other Stories
121
Poetry and war Beware Soul Brother and Other Poems
134
The critic as novelist Anthills of the Savannah
150
Conclusion
165
Notes
174
Bibliography
186
Index
197

Courting the voters A Man of the People
83

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ix - Language, for the individual consciousness, lies on the borderline between oneself and the other. The word in language is half someone else's. It becomes 'one's own...

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information