Chips from a German Workshop, Volume 3

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C. Scribner, 1871 - Folklore
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Page 190 - St. Louis and his companions, as described by JoinvilLe, not only in their glistening armour, but in their every-day attire, are brought nearer to us, become intelligible to us, and teach us lessons of humanity which we can learn from men only, and not from saints and heroes. Here lies the real value of real history. It widens our minds and our hearts, and...
Page 55 - Nibelunge," such as it was written down at the end of the twelfth, or the beginning of the thirteenth century, is "Sorrow after Joy.
Page 56 - And she rushes to her mother Ute, that she may read the dream for her ; and her mother tells her what it means. And then the coy maiden answers : — " No more, no more, dear mother, say, From many a woman's fortune this truth is clear as day, That falsely smiling Pleasure with Pain requites us ever. I from both will keep me, and thus will sorrow never.
Page 3 - For no man hath propounded to himself the general state of learning to be described and represented from age to age, as many have done the works of nature, and the state civil and ecclesiastical; without which the history of the world seemeth to me to be as the statue of Polyphemus with his eye out, that part being wanting which doth most shew the spirit and life of the person...
Page 190 - Joinville, not only in their glistening armour, but in their every-day attire, are brought nearer to us, become intelligible to us, and teach us lessons of humanity which we can learn from men only, and not from saints and heroes. Here lies the real value of real history. It widens our minds and our hearts, and gives us that true knowledge of the world and of human nature In all its phases which but few can gain in the short span of their own life, and in the narrow sphere of their friends and enemies....
Page 141 - I hear them, bell-notes sad and slow, Ah! a wild and wondrous tale revealing Of the drowned wreck of love below. There a world in loveliness decaying Lingers yet in beauty ere it die ; Phantom forms across my senses playing, Flash like golden fire-flakes from the sky.
Page 102 - ... and seclude yourself from society. But this is not the case ; you will like society all the better. For where the carcass is there will all the eagles be gathered, so where error is, truth will go, to lead the captive free. This will make you love amusement for the sake of doing good. Then you will rejoice with those that rejoice and weep with those that weep, and your happiness will be their happiness.
Page 57 - 0 happy falcon that thou art, Thou fliest wherever thou likest, Thou choosest in the forest A tree that pleases thee. Thus I too had done, I chose myself a man : Him my eyes selected. Beautiful ladies envy me for it. Alas ! why will they not leave me my love ? I did not desire the beloved of any one of them. Now woe to thee, joy of summer ! The song of birds is gone ; So are the leaves of the lime tree : Henceforth, my pretty eyes too Will be overcast. My love, thou shouldst take leave Of other...
Page 54 - Then truly was the time of singing come ; for princes and prelates, emperors and squires, the wise and the simple, men, women, and children, all sang and rhymed, or delighted in hearing it done It was a universal noise of Song; as if the Spring of Manhood had arrived, and warbling* from every spray, not indeed without infinite twitterings also, which, except their gladness had no music, were bidding it welcome.
Page 12 - Franee and Germany, but England and Northern Italy were drawn into this gay society. Henry II married Eleanor of Poitou, and her grace and beauty found eloquent admirers in the army of the Crusaders. Their daughter Mathilde was married to Henry the Lion, of Saxony, and one of the Provencal poets has celebrated her loveliness. Frenchmen became the tutors of the sons of the German nobility. French manners, dresses, dishes, and dances were the fashion everywhere. The poetry which flourished at the castles...

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