Christian Science

Front Cover
ReadHowYouWant.com, Oct 1, 2006 - Social Science - 404 pages
2 Reviews
An enduringly popular work by Twain, this book mocks the Christian Science Church and pokes fun at its founder Mary Baker Eddy. Established in late 19th-century, the church propounded the belief of healing through prayer and greatly relied on the power of human imagination. Twain has brilliantly employed wit, humour, and satire to voice his views. Highly illuminating!
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

Twain turns his acerbic wit to examining what was then a new religion on the American scene. He uses Mary Baker Eddy's own words to demonstrate that Christian Science is vacuous, fatuous, and ... Read full review

Review: Christian Science

User Review  - Kay - Goodreads

For some reason I thought there was more to this book than just the Christian Science piece. I was wrong. Part literary criticism, part religious debunking... I don't know about this one. The first ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
2
III
8
IV
30
V
40
VI
45
VII
53
VIII
75
XV
143
XVI
155
XVII
161
XVIII
246
XIX
280
XX
283
XXI
295
XXII
296

IX
89
X
93
XI
104
XII
106
XIII
117
XIV
135
XXIII
301
XXIV
303
XXV
305
XXVI
319
XXVII
389
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About the author (2006)

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled throughout the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, Gilded Age in 1873, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

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