Christianity and Monasticism in Wadi Al-Natrun: Essays from the 2002 International Symposium of the Saint Mark Foundation and the Saint Shenouda the Archimandrite Coptic Society

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Maged S. A. Mikhail, Mark Moussa
American Univ in Cairo Press, 2009 - Religion - 349 pages
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Wadi al-Natrun, a depression in the Western Desert of Egypt, is one of the most important centers for the development and continued thriving of the Coptic monastic tradition. Christianity and monasticism have prospered there from as early as the fourth century until the present day, when four major monasteries still flourish. Here, international specialists in Coptology, examine various aspects of Coptic civilization in Wadi al-Natrun over the past seventeen hundred years. The studies center on aspects of the history and development of monasticism inWadi al-Natrun, as well as the art, architecture, and archaeology of the four existing and numerous former monasteries of the region.
Contributors: Elizabeth S. Bolman, Karl-Heinz Brune, Peter Grossmann, Johannes den Heijer, Suzana Hodak, Lucy-Anne Hunt, Mat Immerzeel, Martin Krause, Ewa Parandowska, S.G. Richter, Rushdi Said, Zuzana Skalova, Hany H. Takla, Tim Vivian, Jacques van der Vliet, Youhanna NessimYoussef, Ugo Zanetti.
 

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Contents

The Multiethnic Character of the Wadi alNatrun
12
Wadi alNatrun and Coptic Literature
43
Wadi Natrun in Geologic History
63
Consecration of the Myron at Saint Macarius Monastery
106
Liturgy at Wadi alNatrun
122
Depictions of Monastic Genealogy
143
On the Architecture at WadT alNatrun
159
The Ornamental Repertoire in the Wallpaintings
185
An Assessment of the Earliest
211
The Stuccoes of Dayr
246
Results of the Recent Restoration Campaigns 19952000
272
Coptic Epigraphy
329
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About the author (2009)

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Maged S.A. Mikhail is assistant professor of history at California State University, Fullerton, specializing in late antique and early Islamic history, and is the editor of Coptica.
Mark Moussa is completing his doctoral dissertation in Semitic and Egyptian languages and literatures at the Catholic University of America. He has published several articles on Egyptian monasticism.

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