Christianity and the Labor Movement

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Sherman, French, 1912 - Christian sociology - 108 pages
 

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Page 6 - And when the ten heard it, they were moved with indignation concerning the two brethren. But Jesus called them unto him, and said, Ye know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones exercise authority over them. Not so shall it be among you: but whosoever would become great among you shall be your minister; and whosoever would be first among you shall be your servant: even as the Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom...
Page 63 - To us it seems that the churches must stand— For equal rights and complete justice for all men in all stations of life. For the right of all men to the opportunity for self-maintenance, a right ever to be wisely and strongly safeguarded against encroachments of every kind. For the right of workers to some protection against the hardships often resulting from the swift crises of industrial change.
Page 68 - For the gradual and reasonable reduction of the hours of labor to the lowest practicable point, and for that degree of leisure for all which is a condition of the highest human life. For a release from employment one day in seven.
Page 67 - For such regulation of the conditions of toil for women as shall safeguard the physical and moral health of the community; For the suppression of the "sweating system...
Page 22 - IT is not what a man outwardly has or wants that constitutes the happiness or misery of him. Nakedness, hunger, distress of all kinds, death itself have been cheerfully suffered, when the heart was right. It is the feeling of injustice that is insupportable to all men. The brutalest black African cannot bear that he should be used unjustly. No man can bear it, or ought to bear it.
Page 53 - ... in the state which is best governed and possesses men who are just absolutely, and not merely relatively to the principle of the constitution, the citizens must not lead the life of mechanics or tradesmen, for such a life is ignoble, and inimical to virtue.
Page 28 - A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that Fortune's inequality exhibits under this sun.
Page 62 - We deem it the duty of all Christian people to concern themselves directly with certain practical industrial problems. To us it seems that the churches must stand — "For equal rights and complete justice for all men in all stations of life.
Page 29 - Some irregularity in employment is doubtless inevitable; but in the main irregularity is remediable. It has been overcome with great profit to both employer and employee in important businesses which have recognized the problem as one seriously demanding solution. Society and industry need only the necessary incentive to secure a great reduction in irregularity of employment. In the scientifically managed business irregularity tends to disappear. So far as it is irremediable it should be compensated...
Page 22 - What is injustice ? Another name for disorder, for unveracity, unreality; a thing which veracious created Nature, even because it is not Chaos and a wastewhirling baseless Phantasm, rejects and disowns. It is not the outward pain of injustice ; that, were it even the flaying of the back with knotted scourges, the severing of the head with guillotines, is comparatively a small matter. The real smart is the soul's pain and stigma, the hurt inflicted on the moral self.

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