Chronicles and Its Synoptic Parallels in Samuel, Kings, and Related Biblical Texts

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Liturgical Press, 1998 - Religion - 356 pages
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The importance of synoptic parallels for study of the Hebrew Bible and the emergence in recent decades of fresh energy for studying the book of Chronicles has inspired scholars across North America to take a new view of the historical books of the Old Testament (Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles). Chronicles and Its Synoptic Parallels in Samuel, Kings, and Related Biblical Texts provides a synoptic view of these historical books, facilitating for students the study of them in relation to each other and to other selected parallel texts in the Hebrew Bible. The author of Chronicles used much of Samuel and Kings in presenting his version of Israel's ?history.? With this book, readers can easily see how the Chronicler refashioned many texts in Samuel-Kings and incorporated details and passages from other biblical books such as the Psalms and Isaiah. Chronicles and Its Synoptic Parallels in Samuel, Kings, and Related Biblical Texts demonstrates that the Chronicler was a student and interpreter of sacred texts as well as a historian for his era. Since many biblical translations of these Old Testament books have not focused on the issue of parallels, Chronicles and Its Synoptic Parallels in Samuel, Kings, and Related Biblical Texts features a fresh translation based on the principle of synoptic parallels. This version respects the literary order and integrity of each text, even when that means foresaking the chronology. For students of Samuel-Kings (and the rest of the deuteronomistic history) this book provides an important key to understanding that history in the early Jewish era in which Chronicles was written. It also assists those whose interests in these books are religious and theological as well as literary and historical. Chronicles and Its Synoptic Parallels in Samuel, Kings, and Related Biblical Texts provides Chronicles as the lead text in part one and Samuel-Kings as the lead text in part two. The text is in a parallel format so that readers can easily follow the text from Samuel-Kings, from Chronicles, and from other parallel texts. An introduction explains the value of synoptic parallel study of these books; reviews other tools available and describes their particular tendencies; provides the editors' translation principles; summarizes the content; and shows how these synoptic parallels can be used in a variety of different approaches to biblical study (literary, historical, compositional, theological). A chart of synoptic relationship is also included.?Students (and I suspect even one or two teachers) will find this useful.? Journal for the Study of the Old Testament?... supersedes all earlier English works and will serve students well.? The Catholic Biblical Quarterly?This book is an important step forward in the study of the Bible.... The authors deserve our thanks for the years of work and cooperation which were necessary to complete this project.? Loren Mack-Fisher?The volume will serve, certainly, as an essential and useful study-tool of the Hebrew Scriptures' parallel texts for many years, especially for those who are not versed in the original Biblical languages.? Dr. Isaac Kalimi Leiden Institute for the Study of Religions University of Leiden, Holland?This excellent fresh study of parallel texts found in the Books of Chronicles and elsewhere in the Hebrew Bible is both a contribution to the recent scholarly interest in Chronicles and a superb tool to help further that interest.... A splendid plan, splendidly brought to completion.? Walter Harrelson
 

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Contents

Sections 494551
50
Sections 552569
154
Sections 570667
194
Appendix
351
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 11 - Jakan. The sons of Dishan; Uz, and Aran. 43 ^[ Now these are the kings that reigned in the land of Edom before any king reigned over the children of Israel; Bela the son of Beor: and the name of his city was Dinhabah.
Page xxiii - ... and all the days of Enosh were nine hundred and five years : and he died.

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About the author (1998)

John C. Endres, SJ, has been teaching Old Testament / Hebrew Bible at the Jesuit School of Theology (in Berkeley) of Santa Clara University since 1982. He was chief editor of Chronicles and Its Synoptic Parallels in the Books of Samuel, Kings, and Related Biblical Texts (Liturgical Press). He also writes and teaches on the Psalms, the deuterocanonical books, Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Book of Jubilees.

Millar is Professor of Religious Studies at Linfield College, McMinnville, Oregon.

Pauline A. Viviano is an associate professor of theology at Loyola University Chicago. She received her doctorate in biblical languages and literature from St. Louis University. Besides articles in academic and popular journals, her publications include reading guides for the books of Joshua, Judges, First and Second Samuel, First and Second Kings, and Ruth for the "Catholic Study Bible" published by Oxford University Press, and "Collegeville Bible Commentary Volume 2: Genesis" (Liturgical Press, 1985). In addition to university teaching she often lectures at parishes in and around Chicago.

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