Chubster: A Hipster's Guide to Losing Weight While Staying Cool

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012 - HEALTH & FITNESS - 227 pages
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ARE YOUR SKINNY JEANS STARTING TO FEEL A LITTLE SNUG?
You don t have the right clothes for the gym. You don t do protein powders, wonder berries, or green tea. The idea of going without beer makes you weak in the knees.
But there s no denying you are one. fat. hipster.
Lucky for you, Martin Cizmar has come up with the least awful diet plan of all time. The Chubster way. It revolves around calorie counting (deal with it) and enjoyable undercover exercise (urban hiking and gum chewing). Martin gives you the tools to become a self-sufficient weight-loss machine capable of functioning in any environment. From frozen dinners and drive-through menus, ethnic eating to microbrews, he ll point you to the responsible choice, steer you clear of the real diet killers, and dispel some of the myths giving you that tire around your waist. Like: That Stella you re holding? It has more calories than Guinness.
Dieting is never fun, but with Chubster, weight loss doesn t have to cramp your style.
MARTIN CIZMAR lost 100 pounds in eight months on the Chubster diet. He s worked at the Akron Beacon Journal and Phoenix New Times, where he was the music critic. He currently lives in Portland, Oregon, where he works as an editor at Willamette Week. In his spare time, he enjoys hiking, longboarding, and riding around town on the vintage beach cruiser he bought at a thrift store. He considers barbecue and craft beer his cruelest temptations. This is his first book.

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About the author (2012)

Martin Cizmar lost 100 pounds in eight months on the Chubster diet. He's worked at the Akron Beacon Journal and Phoenix New Times , where he was the music critic. He currently lives in Portland, Oregon, where he works as an editor at Willamette Week . In his spare time, he enjoys hiking, longboarding, and riding around town on the vintage beach cruiser he bought at a thrift store. He considers barbecue and craft beer his cruelest temptations. This is his first book.

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