"Cien años de soledad" y un homenaje: discursos

Front Cover
Fondo de Cultura Economica, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 40 pages
0 Reviews
En una bella edicion y dentro de su coleccion Centzontle, el FCE recupera los discursos de Gabriel Garcia Marquez y Carlos Fuentes pronunciados en torno a una conmemoracion unica: los 80 anos del Premio Nobel colombiano y los 40 anos de la novela Cien anos de soledad. Una celebracion de la cual el lector puede ser testigo privilegiado a traves de este libro. Garcia Marquez recuerda en estas paginas que "ni en el mas delirante" de sus suenos imagino que su novela llegaria a ser leida por casi 50 millones de lectores, un numero tal de personas que si vivieran en un solo pedazo de tierra seria uno de los 20 paises mas poblados del mundo.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2007)

Carlos Fuentes was born in Panama on November 11, 1928. He studied law at the National University of Mexico and did graduate work at the Institute des Hautes Etudes in Switzerland. He entered Mexico's diplomatic service and wrote in his spare time. His first novel, Where the Air Is Clear, was published in 1958. His other works include The Death of Artemio Cruz, Destiny and Desire, and Vlad. The Old Gringo was later adapted as a film starring Gregory Peck and Jane Fonda in 1989. He won numerous awards including the Fuentes the Romulo Gallegos Prize in Venezuela for Terra Nostra, the National Order of Merit in France, the Cervantes Prize in 1987, and Spain's Prince of Asturias Award for literature in 1994. He also wrote essays, short stories, screenplays, and political nonfiction. In addition to writing, he taught at numerous universities, including Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, and Brown. He served as the ambassador of Mexico to France. He died on May 15, 2012 at the age of 83.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia. After studying law and journalism at the National University of Colombia in Bogota, he became a journalist. In 1965, he left journalism, to devote himself to writing. Acclaimed for both his craft and his imagination, he has been called a master of myth and magical realism (a style of literature that makes use of fantastical, highly improbable, and sometimes supernatural events and characters). In his novels and stories he has created a fictional world out of his memories of the dust, rain, and boredom of life in an isolated Colombian community. His stories depict a world shaped by myth, history, politics, and nature. Garcia Marquez first created Macondo, his fictional town, in his short story collections Leaf Storm (1955) and No One Writes to the Colonel (1961), but it was the novel One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) that brought both Macondo and Garcia Marquez to world attention. One Hundred Years of Solitude traces a century in the town's history, from its founding through its destruction by a cyclone. Skillfully blending the fantastic, the mythical, and the commonplace in a humorous and powerful narrative, Garcia Marquez tells a moving tale of people locked in an isolation, partly of their own making and partly due to U.S. and European cultural and political domination of Latin America. With this work, Garcia Marquez established himself internationally as a major novelist, and his reputation has continued to grow since he was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1982.

Bibliographic information