Cildo Meireles

Front Cover
Phaidon Press, Sep 30, 1999 - Art - 160 pages
1 Review
Born in 1948, Cildo Meireles is one of Brazil's most significant artists of the post-war period. A pioneer of installation art since the 1960s, Meireles is best known for his dramatic and politically charged walk-in environments, which often incorporate sound, smell and touch alongside visual experience, requiring the viewer's full perceptual involvement. His installation Atraves (Through, 1983-89) confronts the viewer with a prohibitive labyrinth of grilles, meshes and barriers of all descriptions, the floor covered in shimmering yet dangerous shards of broken glass. In this and other works, surprises and contradictions combine to scramble our habitual definitions of our environment, resulting in a metaphor of the imperfect, potentially hostile world in which we live. In other works, Meireles offers an alternative - visual, political, sensual - to the real but often disappointing circumstances around us. For several decades Meireles has been included in the most significant international surveys, from the landmark 'Information' exhibition at New York's The Museum of Modern Art in 1970 to the 24th Biennial of Sao Paulo in 1998.

In the Survey, Brazil-based curator and critic Paulo Herkenhoff analyses in depth the specific political and cultural context of Meireles' Brazilian art in counterpoint to the philosophical contexts of Western art history. Havana-based curator and writer Gerardo Mosquera discusses with the artist the context of his work in post-war Latin American art. In the Focus, New York curator and critic Dan Cameron navigates three environments of intense red, collectively titled Desvio para o Vermelho (Red Shift, 1967-84). For the Artist's Choice, Meireles has selected a text that echoes his work's frequent evocation of paradoxs: 'The Garden of Forking Paths' by Jorge Luis Borges. Since the late 1960s Cildo Meireles has written detailed project descriptions as an integral aspect of his work. Ranging from the description of the 'ideological circuits' of information and commodity transactions, to speculations on theories of perception, his texts often bear witness both to individual and social crises and the transformative powers of the imagination.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

David Dyergrew up in a coastal town in NSW, Australia, and graduated as dux of his high school in 1984. After commencing a degree in medicine and surgery at the University of Sydney, he soon decided it was not for him.

David went on to train as a ship's officer at the Australian Maritime College, travelling Australia and the world in a wide range of merchant ships. He graduated from the college with distinction and was awarded a number of prizes, including the Company of Master Mariners Award for highest overall achievement in the course. He then returned to the University of Sydney to complete a combined degree in Arts and Law. David was awarded the Frank Albert Prize for first place in Music I, High Distinctions in all English courses and First Class Honours in Law. From the mid-1990s until early 2000s David worked as a litigation lawyer in Sydney, and then in London at a legal practice whose parent firm represented the Titanic's owners back in 1912. In 2002 David returned to Australia and obtained a Diploma in Education from the University of New England, and commenced teaching English at Kambala, a school for girls in Sydney's eastern suburbs.

David has had a life-long obsession with the Titanic and has become an expert on the subject. In 2009 he was awarded a Commonwealth Government scholarship to write The Midni

Bibliographic information