Circle Time for Emotional Literacy

Front Cover
SAGE, Jul 11, 2006 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 160 pages
0 Reviews
Emotional literacy has become an important issue in schools, and the ethos behind Circle Time is complementary to the thinking behind this. The Social, Emotional and Behavioural Skills curriculum (SEBS) is being established in schools, and it is recognised as contributing to a positive and successful school environment.

Offering many new ideas and activities to try out in Circle Time, this book covers:

- why your school needs Circle Time

- how you go about starting Circle Time in your school

- the underlying philosophy and basic rules

- he role of the teacher as facilitator - how you make it work

- what to do if language and attention issues are problematic

- how to tackle common problems that can occur

The activities look at promoting listening and attention skills, self-awareness and self-esteem, class cohesion and empathy, co-operation and friendship skills.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter 1 Setting the Scene
1
Chapter 2 The Circle Time Framework and Getting Circle Time Going in Your Class
11
Chapter 3 The Basics
23
Chapter 4 Circle Activities to Promote Communication
31
Chapter 5 Selfawareness and Selfesteem
47
Understanding and Managing Feelings
61
Tuning into Others
80
Chapter 8 Friendship and Cooperation
96
Useful Resources
130
Circle Time Plan
137
Proforma Letter of ParentsCarers About Circle Time
138
Social Bingo
139
Responsibility Circles
140
References
141
Index
143
Copyright

Chapter 9 Challenges and Solutions
110

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2006)

Previously a teacher and educational psychologist, Sue Roffey is currently adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Western Sydney and Honorary Lecturer at University College London. She is a prolific author, international educational consultant and speaker on issues related to pro-social behaviour, belonging, resilience and positive relationships within education.  She is the founder and director of Wellbeing Australia (www.wellbeingaustralia.com.au/wba) and now lives between Sydney and London.  Sue can be contacted through www.sueroffey.com and www.circlesolutionsnetwork.com/csn.

Bibliographic information