Circles

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Xlibris Corporation LLC, Jun 1, 2008 - Fiction - 216 pages
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BOOK DESCRIPTION FOR BOOK'S PAGE ON THE XLIBRIS WEB SITE In 2003, William Oscar Jones had become totally dissatisfied with the senseless and no thrilling productions of Hollywood. Time and time again he had watched movies with senseless scenes and non-dramatic endings. So William set out in the spring of 2003 to produce a better movie by writing a book that he felt would reflect the true qualities of a satisfactory movie. First of all, William desired to write a book where every scene would relate to the theme, title, and ending. He wanted a book that would convey moral principles and teach valuable lessons. As a man of little income, William was very familiar with the day to day difficulties of the common man. So he wanted to write a book that would appeal to the common man as well as the rich. The idea for William's book Circles started in January of 2003, while William and his fellow security officer were conversing in front of the home of the World Bank president. William and his associate were parked in a security vehicle guarding the president's house when William made the statements, "The president could at least send his maid to us with glasses of water or food. I wonder how he would feel if he were out here in this cramped vehicle and we showed no concern for his welfare?" From those statements developed the theme for William's book Circles a rich man replacing the position of a poor man. The thoughts of that conversation had disappeared by spring of that year, until William saw his fifth and final dissatisfying movie. After seeing that movie, William became frustrated and thought to himself, "If Hollywood can't produce a movie decent enough to satisfy me, then hell, I will satisfy myself." William knew that he could write a better movie than the ones he had witness. So in the spring of 2003, William set out to write a book, and as he thought about various themes, the conversation he had had in January came back to mind and the theme for Circles was born. William had interacted with many wealthy people through his job at World Bank and as a caterer for a popular Indian restaurant in Washington, DC, and he had developed a strong dislike for them. He did not dislike wealthy people simply out of envy, but through his interactions with them, William discovered that most people of wealth have very little moral character and concern for people less fortunate than they. He discovered that most wealthy people are proud and arrogant and feel that they are better than the average person. So, after experiencing both sides, rich life and poor life, William decided to write a book that would appeal to both readers, rich and poor. So came Circles. Circles is a story about a young man name John Sellers, who by nature is a kind and caring kid. But due to the effects of his racist father, who is a member of Southern Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, John grows to become a cruel and racist young man. John's biological father eventually dies, and John's mother Kate remarries to an extremely moral man name Peter Braxton. Peter takes on the task of trying to reverse the racist and cruel ways of John, but Peter would eventually learn that John is too deeply rooted into the racist ways of his father. After training and instilling in John all the moral principles that he could, Peter gave up on what seemed to be a hopeless effort, and he warned John that one day his evil ways would come back to haunt him. John's last name became Braxton after his adoption by Peter Braxton, and later in life he becomes a billionaire, the world's third wealthiest person. John would eventually encounter a tragedy that would reduce him to the level of a bum, and the only people who would be willing to assist him are the very people that he had once abused and despised. After being redeemed by this experience, John would ultimately become the truly kind person that he really is and

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