Citadel to City-state: The Transformation of Greece, 1200-700 B.C.E.

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Indiana University Press, Jan 1, 1999 - History - 199 pages
The "Dark Age" of Greece is one of the least understood periods of Greek history. Following the collapse of the brilliant Mycenaean civilisation of Late Bronze Age Greece and preceding the equally brilliant and better documented Classical period, The Dark Age was, until the last few decades, largely neglected. The neglect can be explained partly by the fact that the disruptions that brought down the Mycenaean civilisation left a depopulated landscape seemingly devoid not only of large population centres but in many places of any population at all. And the Dark Age is dark, In large part, because it has left no written records.
Development of new techniques in archaeological method and a new focus on the study of the way life was lived outside of the great cities has renewed interest in the Dark Age. This new focus has led To The discovery of new evidence and To The reevaluation of old evidence as well, and it is now possible to develop a larger and longer view of the entire period.
This book traces the process of change that transformed the Bronze Age civilisation into the city-state culture of the Classical Age. Each century from 1200-700 BCE is explored through an individual site – Mycenae, Nichoria, Athens, Lefkandi, Cornith, and Ascra – that illustrates the major features of each period. Intended to complement recent, more exhaustive and technical works,From Citadel to City-Stateis a remarkable account of historical detective work that is beginning to shed light on Dark Age Greece.

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Contents

Mycenae
1
Lefkandi
85
Corinth
115
Ascra
144
GLOSSARY 163 ABBREVIATIONS 173 NOTES
175
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About the author (1999)

Carol G. Thomas is Professor of Ancient Greek History at the University of Washington. Her books include Decoding Ancient History: A Toolkit of the Historian as Detective (with D. Wick); Myth Becomes History; Progress into the Past, 2nd Edition (with William A. McDonald); and Paths from Ancient Greece. She is two-time president of the Association of Ancient Historians.Craig Conant is a long-time student of ancient Greek history and works as a records manager for the Environmental Protection Agency in Seattle, Washington.

Carol G. Thomas is Professor of Ancient Greek History at the University of Washington. Her books include Decoding Ancient History: A Toolkit of the Historian as Detective (with D. Wick); Myth Becomes History; Progress into the Past, 2nd Edition (with William A. McDonald); and Paths from Ancient Greece. She is two-time president of the Association of Ancient Historians.Craig Conant is a long-time student of ancient Greek history and works as a records manager for the Environmental Protection Agency in Seattle, Washington.

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