Citizen-Soldiers and Manly Warriors: Military Service and Gender in the Civic Republican Tradition

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Aug 28, 1999 - Political Science - 192 pages
0 Reviews
What happens in a tradition that links citizenship with soldiering when women become citizens? Citizen Soldiers and Manly Warriors: Military Service and Gender in the Civic Republican Tradition provides an in-depth analysis of the theory and practice of the citizen-soldier in historical context. Using a postmodern feminist lens, Snyder reveals that within the citizen-soldier tradition, citizenship and masculinity are simultaneously constituted through engagement in civic and martial practices. Seeking to sever the connection between masculinity and citizenship, Snyder calls for women to make 'gender trouble' by engaging in the practices traditionally constitutive of masculine republican citizenship. However, in order to reconstitute the Citizen-Soldier traditionDthe only tradition we have that holds the military up to democratic standardsDwe must not only 'trouble' but also reconfigure our understandings of gender and citizenship. Thus gender parity in the American military is not enough. We must also change the type of masculinity produced by the military, reintroduce the military to its civic purposes, expand the 'citizenship of civic practices' to include other non-martial forms of service, and give citizens a greater role in political decision making.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction
1
Chapter 2 Machiavelli and the Citizenship of Civic Practices
15
Civic Festivals Martial Practices and the Production of Civic Identity
45
Chapter 4 The Civic Rituals of the American CitizenSoldier
79
Interrogating the Republican Discourse of the American Right
107
Military Academies Hazing Rituals and the Reconstitution of the CitizenSoldier
137
Selected Bibliography
169
Index
175
About the Author
183
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

R. Claire Snyder is assistant professor in the Department of Public and International affairs at George Mason University.

Bibliographic information