City Kids, City Teachers: Reports from the Front Row

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William Ayers, Patricia Ford
The New Press, 1996 - Education - 345 pages
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A powerful myth plaguing many of our urban schools is the belief that African-American, Latino, and immigrant children are nothing but trouble. City Kids, City Teachers offers a new look at urban schools by examining the city, the kids, and the teachers to explode stereotypes of teaching in the city. In more than twenty-five provocative essays set in context by Ayers and Ford, leading educators and writers explore the realities of city classrooms from kindergarten through high school. City Kids, City Teachers moves back and forth from the poetic to the practical, celebrating the value of city kids and their teachers. It is a useful guide as well as a call to action for anyone who teaches, has taught, or is considering teaching in urban schools, and for every parent with children in our schools today.
 

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City Kids, City Teachers: Reports from the Front Row

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This book contains more than 25 essays from educators and writers exploring the realities of city classrooms from kindergarten through 12th grade. City teachers and administrators will relish the book ... Read full review

Contents

Urban Pedagogy 2 II
2
Me A Name I Call Myself
25
zAMI A New Spelling of My Name
42
DE BoraH STERN Testing 1 2 3
66
Go Back and Circle the Verbs
286
Organizing and Teaching 3o 5
329
Chaos and Opportunity
335
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