City of Bits: Space, Place, and the Infobahn

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MIT Press, 1996 - Computers - 225 pages
Cliche alert: just as railroads influenced settlement patterns and economics of the 19th century, and automobiles influenced settlement, commerce, and recreation in the 20th century, computer networks will influence how we live, work, and move (and how and even whether we move) in the 21st century. William Mitchell, from MIT, is one of the first scholars to rigorously examine this modern cliche, and draws heavily on the history of architecture, and urbanism. If you suspect there is truth in these truisms, and want to get beyond facile sloganeering prophesying an infintely ductile future, I highly recommend this book. Mitchell does a very job of explaining not just how things are likely to change, but also of examining historical precendents such as telephony, and to what degree previous prognostications came true.
 

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Contents

PULLING GLASS
3
ELECTRONIC AGORAS
7
CYBORG CITIZENS
27
RECOMBINANT ARCHITECTURE
47
SOFT CITIES
107
BIT BIZ
133
GETTING TO THE GOOD BITS
163
NOTES
175
SURF SITES
209
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
215
INDEX
217
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

William J. Mitchell was the Alexander W. Dreyfoos, Jr., Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences and directed the Smart Cities research group at MIT's Media Lab.

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