City of Courts: Socializing Justice in Progressive Era Chicago

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 17, 2003 - History - 332 pages
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What could be more "liberal" than the modern idea of social responsibility for crimeo that crime is less the product of free will than of poverty and other social forces beyond the individual's control? And what could be more "progressive" than the belief that the law should aim for social, not merely individual, justice? This work of social, cultural, and legal history uncovers the contested origins and paradoxical consequences of the two protean concepts in the cosmopolitan cities of industrial America at the turn of the twentieth century.
 

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Contents

The Price of Justice
3
A Managerial Revolution
29
Rethinking Responsibility for a Social Age
59
Socializing the Law
96
Practices
117
Socialized Law in Action
119
Keep Sober Work and Support His Family The Court of Domestic Relations
128
To Protect Her from the Greed as well as the Passions of Man The Morals Court
172
Upon the Threshold of Manhood The Boys Court
208
Keep the Life Stream Pure The Psychopathic Laboratory
241
Misgivings
279
Americas First War on Crime
281
Afterword
313
Archival Sources from the Municipal Court of Chicago
322
Index
325
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