Civic Biology: Textbook of Problems, Local and National, that Can be Solved Only by Civic Co÷peration

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Page 344 - I do not know what I may appear to the world ; but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 353 - Then, as touching the kind of work done by these two men, the more I think of it I find this conclusion more impressed upon me, — that the greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something, and tell what it saw in a plain way.
Page 328 - All that we can do, is to keep steadily in mind that each organic being is striving to increase in a geometrical ratio; that each at some period of its life, during some season of the year, during each generation, or at intervals, has to struggle for life and to suffer great destruction1. When we reflect on this struggle, we may console ourselves with the full belief, that the war of nature is not incessant...
Page 353 - I find this conclusion more impressed upon me, — that the greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something, and tell what it saw in a plain way. Hundreds of people can talk for one who can think, but thousands can think for one who can see. To see clearly is poetry, prophecy, and religion, — all in one.
Page 348 - In all this, book-learning is available. A capacity and taste for reading gives access to whatever has already been discovered by others. It is the key, or one of the keys, to the already solved problems. And not only so : it gives a relish and facility for successfully pursuing the unsolved ones.
Page x - one single idea may have greater weight than the labor of all the men, animals, and engines for a century." Figures are not easy for most of us to grasp in these days when the census deals with millions and billions, so, in considering what the people of Wisconsin do for a livelihood, it is well to think of our 2,632,067 people, which the census reported in 1920, as made up of 1,000 communities with 2,632...
Page 328 - It is good thus to try in our imagination to give any form some advantage over another. Probably in no single instance should we know what to do, so as to succeed. It will convince us of our ignorance on the mutual relations of all organic beings; a conviction as necessary, as it seems to be difficult to acquire.
Page 328 - An exact determination of the laws of heredity will probably work more change in man's outlook on the world, and in his power over nature, than any other advance in natural knowledge that can be clearly foreseen.
Page 92 - Population must increase rapidly, more rapidly than in former times, and ere long the most valuable of all arts will be the art of deriving a comfortable subsistence from the smallest area of soil. No community whose every member possesses this art, can ever be the victim of oppression in any of its forms. Such community will be alike independent of crowned kings, money kings, and land kings.
Page 95 - My first suggestion is an inquiry as to the effect of greater thoroughness in all the departments of Agriculture than now prevails in the North-West — perhaps I might say in America. To speak entirely within bounds, it is known that fifty bushels of wheat, or one hundred bushels of Indian corn can be produced from an acre.

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