Civility: Manners, Morals, And The Etiquette Of Democracy

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Basic Books, Apr 10, 1998 - History - 384 pages
In this followup to Integrity, Yale law professor Stephen Carter continues to meditate upon the “prepolitical” qualities on which a healthy society is based.Why do people show poorer manners today than in previous ages? How did we come to confuse rudeness with self-expression and acting on our “rights”? Carter looks at these and other important questions with a combination of his personal experiences and an extremely long shelf of reading material, all the while maintaining an informal writing style that continually—but politely—engages the reader, inviting him or her to think about these issues along with Carter.There are important messages here about generosity and trust, about respecting diversity and dissent, and about resolving conflict through dialogue rather than mandate. Stephen Carter would never be so uncivil as to demand your attention, but Civility most definitely compels.

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CIVILITY: Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy

User Review  - Kirkus

Spirited argument for an uncontroversial position. Complaints about incivility are timeless, but Carter (Law/Yale; The Dissent of the Governed, p. 312, etc.) believes that this time the barbarians ... Read full review

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User Review  - debnance - LibraryThing

Very inspiring take on our society's urgent need for civility from an intelligent and articulate law professor. I highly recommend this book. (Yes! Believe it or not, a book on civility written by a ... Read full review

Contents

Barbarians Running Late ma leo 2 Do Manners Matter?
20
The Death of the Golden
38
Welcoming the Stranger
55
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Stephen L. Carter is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Yale University, and is the author of several acclaimed books, including Culture of Disbelief, Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby, Integrity, and Civility. He is a leading public intellectual who appears regularly on national television and radio, and his writings have appeared in major national magazines and newspapers. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

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