Claiming Breath

Front Cover
U of Nebraska Press, 1996 - Social Science - 119 pages
"This is a rich, satisfying book, full of wisdom."-Choice. "Glancy is a major voice in Native America today. Claiming Breath is a refreshingly honest depiction of contemporary life and an important step in American Indian literature. Non-Indian readers can learn much from Glancy's text, which presents an Indian worldview complete in its holistic complexity and integrity."-American Indian Culture and Research Journal. "An important addition to the literature of white-Indian cultural interrelationships."-World Literature Today. Like poets of legend, Diane Glancy has spent much of her life on the road. For years she supported her family by driving throughout Oklahoma and Arkansas teaching poetry in the schools. Claiming Breath is an account of one of those years, what Glancy calls "a winter count of sorts, a calendar, a diary of personal matters . . . and a final acceptance of the broken past. . . . It's a year that covers more than a year." Diane Glancy teaches creative writing and Native American literature at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her collections of poetry, Iron Woman, and of short fiction, Trigger Dance, have also won major prizes.
 

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CLAIMING BREATH

User Review  - Kirkus

Glancy (the story collection Trigger Dance, 1990) won the North American Indian Prose Award for this wildly uneven grab-bag in the form of a journal: fresh language and banality, fine prose- poetry ... Read full review

Claiming breath

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This collection of works records the difficulties and moments of doubt, as well as the insights and joys of the author's life as a Native American woman who has raised two children, divorced, and is ... Read full review

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About the author (1996)

Diane Glancy teaches creative writing and Native American literature at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her collections of poetry, Iron Woman, and of short fiction, Trigger Dance, have also won major prizes.

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