Clara Barton: A Centenary Tribute to the World's Greatest Humanitarian

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R. G. Badger, 1922 - Nurses - 445 pages
 

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Contents

Pauper Schools from Six to Six Hundred
44
Child LoveJoe and CharlieAppreciation
46
TemperanceClara Barton and the Hired ManStranger than Fiction
50
Looking for a JobEqual Suffrage
52
Credulous OxInnocent ChildClara Barton a Vege tarian
55
Fell Dead on the Ground beside Her
57
Wickedness of WarSettles no Disputes
60
Her Wardrobe in a HandkerchiefThe Battle Scene
64
The Bravery of WomenClara Bartons Bravest Act
67
Yes and Got Euchered
69
To Dream of Home and Mother
72
Tribute of Love and Devotion
74
Cheering WordsAlways ReadyWears a Smile
77
Horrible DeedLeads American NavyAngel of Mercy
82
Confederates and Federals alike Treated
87
The Enemy StarvingTactThe White Ox
90
Bullethole Amputated Limbs Like Cordwood God Gives Strength
92
Fearless of Bullets and Kicking Mules
95
His Comfort not Hers His Life not Hers
97
Does not Need any Advice
100
Had but a Few Moments to Live
102
Enlisted Men FirstThe Colonels Life Saved
105
Youre Right MadamGood Day
108
Bleeding to DeathHi Headless BodyWomen in the War
109
Timid ChildTimid Woman
113
Ez Ef We Wuz White Folks
115
In Her DreamsAgain in Battle
118
Four Famous Women
120
Simplicity of ChildhoodPet WaspsPet CatsLoved LifeDomestic
124
Clara Barton in the Literary Field
129
The Art of DressingClara Bartons Individuality
134
The Jewelled Hand and the Hard Hand Meet
138
Clara Barton and the Emperor
141
AmericaScarlet and GoldEurope
145
Three Cheers Wild Scenes in Boston Tiger 11 No Sweetheart
147
The Last ReceptionHer AutographThe Boys in Gray
150
Open HouseCost of Fame SelfSacrificeBest in Woman
154
Kneeled Before Her and Kissed Her Hand
158
Never Get TiredEating the Least of My Troubles
161
Royalty Under a Quaker Bonnet
163
Still Stamping on MePersonally Unharmed
166
At the MemorialThe Flags of all NationsA Good Time
168
Clara Barton Kept a Diary
172
Clara BartonMary Baker Eddy
192
Like Tolstoi She Lived the Simple Life
194
Clara BartonFlorence Nightingale
197
The General Has MoneyI Am His Reconcentrado
202
Abraham Lincolns Son
205
The Butcher Didnt Get It
207
The Kind of Girls that Needed Help
210
CHimi page LXVT A Romance of Two Continents
212
The Little MonumentFor all Eternity
215
Story of BabaDream of a White HorseLifes Woes
219
People Like Jack RabbitsNo ShowWoman
224
Clara Bartons Heart Secret10000 in Gold Dust
227
Fell on Their Knees before Mis Red Cross
231
Clara Bartons Tribute to Cuba
234
At the Birthplace of NapoleonThe Corsican Bandit
235
When Cares Grow Heavy and Pleasures Light
239
A Red Cross Red Letter Day
240
Patriotic Women of America SelfSacrificing
243
OppositionThe American Red Cross Complete Victory
246
GreetingsNational First Aid Association of America
255
Humanitarianism Unparalleled in All History
265
Clara Bartons Prayer Answered
269
Not the Value of a Postage Stamp
273
Honorary Presidency for LifeProposed Annuity
275
Clara Bartons Resignation
281
No Red Cross Controversy
285
International Red CrossAmerican Red CrossAmerican Amendment
290
Blackmail AllegedCongressional InvestigationTruth of History
295
Of Graves of Worms of Epitaphs
333
TurkeyStatesmanship of PhilanthropyArmenia
341
TreasonLincoln AssassinatedGrant Protects Clara Barton 3
349
President McKinley Sends Clara Barton to Cuba
353
In DetailsClara Barton a Business ManagerWorlds Record
356
Superintendent of Womans Prison
363
GreatnessAn Immortal American DestinyImmortality
367
What Was Her Religion? 37
371
One Day with Clara Barton
374
The Personal CorrespondenceClara Bartons Proposed SelfExpatriation
378
XCVH Closing IncidentsThe BiographyOther Correspondence
392
A Record History at the Funeral
399
Clara Bartons Last Ride
401
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Page 331 - But I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save. I pray that our heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice...
Page 87 - But why do I talk of Death ? That phantom of grisly bone ? I hardly fear his terrible shape, It seems so like my own — It seems so like my own, Because of the fasts I keep ; Oh, God! that bread should be so dear, And flesh and blood so cheap...
Page 91 - With a stifled cry of horror straight she turned away her head; With a sad and bitter feeling looked she back upon her dead ; But she heard the youth's low moaning, and his struggling breath of pain, And she raised the cooling water to his parching lips again.
Page 224 - A blank, my lord : She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i' the bud, Feed on her damask cheek : she pined in thought ; And, with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like patience on a monument, Smiling at grief.
Page 254 - Let me live in my house by the side of the road And be a friend to man.
Page 442 - Oh may I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence: live In pulses stirred to generosity, In deeds of daring rectitude, in scorn For miserable aims that end with self, In thoughts sublime that pierce the night like stars, And with their mild persistence urge man's search to vaster issues.
Page 371 - If the Almighty Ruler of Nations, with His eternal truth and justice, be on your side of the North, or on yours of the South, that truth and that justice will surely prevail by the judgment...
Page 384 - Against the threats Of malice or of sorcery, or that power Which erring men call Chance, this I hold firm: Virtue may be assailed, but never hurt, Surprised by unjust force, but not enthralled; Yea, even that which Mischief meant most harm Shall in the happy trial prove most glory.
Page 125 - Shepherd, I take thy word, And trust thy honest-offered courtesy, Which oft is sooner found in lowly sheds, With smoky rafters, than in tapestry halls And courts of princes, where it first was named, And yet is most pretended.
Page 182 - We live in deeds, not years ; in thoughts, not breaths ; In feelings, not in figures on a dial. We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives Who thinks most — feels the noblest — acts the best...

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