Classical Archaeology of Greece: Experiences of the Discipline

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1996 - History - 199 pages
Archaeologists do not discover the past but take the fragmentary remains which they recover and make something of them. Archaeology is a process of detection and supposition; this is what makes it so fascinating. However, the interpretations of archaeologists differ and change over time. They depend upon the amount of evidence available, the ideas and preconceptions of the archaeologist and their interests and aims.
Michael Shanks's enlivening work is a guide to the discipline of classical archaeology and its objects. It assesses archaeology as a means of reconstructing ancient Greek society using the latest approaches of social archaeology. In addition, The Classical Archaeology of Greece outlines the history of the discipline and discusses why Classical Greece continues to fascinate us and why it has had such an impact on European civilization and identity.
 

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Contents

IV
9
V
22
VI
25
VII
26
VIII
30
IX
37
X
41
XI
43
XXXIII
108
XXXIV
111
XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XL
128
XLII
129

XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XVII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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LI
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LII
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LIV
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LV
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LVI
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LVII
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LVIII
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LIX
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LX
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LXI
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LXII
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Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Michael Shanks is a lecturer in archaeology at the University of Wales, Lampeter.

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