Classical Monologues from Aeschylus to Bernard Shaw: Young men's roles

Front Cover
Applause Theatre & Cinema, 2002 - Drama - 382 pages
Sure to become a mainstay of any actor's shelf, Applause is pleased to present the first two volumes of Leon Katz's monumental monologue collection. Covering the full scope of Western Drama, from the Greeks to the 20th Century, these two volumes contain over 250 monologues from sources other than Shakespeare's plays. The works range from the famous to the little-known, covering over 2,000 years of theatrical history. Katz provides an introduction to each monologue that provides an informative and critical context for actors, directors, students and teachers, but are also of relevance to general readers. Each volume is organized into Tragedy/Drama and Comedy divisions, and the monologues are helpfully arranged by period as well as chronologically. Also, the monologues are fully footnooted afor unfamiliar references and definitions and the bibliography provides exhaustive listings of sources for all the plays from which the monologues have been drawn. Simply put, these two volumes are a must for actors, directors, teachers and students of classical theatre!

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Contents

ft Tamburlaine celebrates his love for Zenocrate and for himself
43
P Gaveston the new kings favorite makes plans
58
Mendoza new court lackey envisions his pleasures in office
72
WB Flamineo uses parable to remind the Duke of his ingratitude for services
96
JiBi Bosola importunes the Cardinal for his reward
111
of his incestuous love
124
CENTURY FRENCHSPANISH
134
H Hippolytus confesses his longconcealed love for Aricia
142
cl581 GIORDANO BRUNO II Candelaio tr J R Hale Act5 Sc 18
238
Mosca ejects Volpones wouldbe heirs
245
RESTORATION
254
PP Rhodophil resolves that he and Doralice must forever suffer the misfortune
262
PP Ramble declares a new order of nature for true wits and against fools
268
PP Whittmore under instructions from Lucia must feign
274
9tt Petro demonstrates how the body can tell a tale and pick a pocket with small
276
80 Maskwell selfcongratulating apostrophizes treachery and double dealing
290

P Genesius rehearsing the part of a martyr wins Christ
149
Hfii Segismund embracing life as a dream ruminates on its final value
156
1681 JOHN BANKS The Unhappy Favorite or The Earl of Essex Act 3 Sc 1
167
Barnwell executes a murder against his will
176
MB Franz contemplates plans for betrayal and murder of father and brother
183
Make me a child again
191
MB Manfred confesses his guilt and despair
200
1829 DOUGLAS JERROLD BlackEyd Susan Act 3 Sc 4
206
1834 ALFRED DE MUSSET Lorenzaccio tr L Katz Act 3 Sc 3
216
GREEK
226
P Marca details soberly how he and his companions cheated the landlord
232
Itib Loveless is disquieted by the logic of his wavering marital affections
303
Hi Beaumine commiserates with and warns IhiluibelL who is in danger of marriage
313
Tartuffe attempts to seduce Elmire the wife of his patron
320
W Don Juan explains his devotion to the fashionable vice hypocrisy
327
K? Arlecchinos account of his trip to the moon
333
Captain Clerimont disguised as a painter offers a young lady her choice
343
Sharp implores his destitute master to marry
349
A Leonce contemplates with cheer love emptiness and boredom
356
Peer Gynt drives his dying mother to Heaven
363
Don Juan speaks his contempt for the uses of life on Earth
370
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Katz is currently a Professor of Theatre at UCLA, as well as Professor Emeritus of Drama, Yale University.