Classical Sāṃkhya: An Interpretation of Its History and Meaning

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 2001 - Hindu philosophy - 315 pages
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The tradition of Samkhya is one of the oldest and most influential in the intellectual history of India. The fundamental notions of Samkhya namely prakrti, purusa, buddhi, ahamkara, manas and the three gunas provided the conceptual framework in which much of Indian philosophizing occurred, and the classical formulations of Yoga and Vedanta together with many traditions of Buddhist philosophy and meditation developed vis-a-vis the intellectual perspective of the Samkhya. Similarly on a general cultural level the influence of Samkhya was profound and important over many centuries in such areas as law, medicine, ancient science and mathematics, logic, mythology, cosmology and ritual. This study traces the history of the Samkhya not only in the Indian intellectual tradition, but also in the traditions of historical criticism. The book also offers a new interpretation of the philosophical significance of the Samkhya, with special reference to the classical interpretation of the interaction of prakrti and purusa. In this edition author has also included a Chart of the Twenty-five Basic Principles of the Samkhya, a Glossary of Samkhya Terminology, an additional Appendix which surveys recent scholarly work in the area of Samkhya together with a discussion of Samkhya in the Purana-s and a revised Bibliography.
 

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Contents

Critical Review of Interpretations
15
Joseph Dahlmann
22
A B Keith
29
Surcndranath Dasgupta
36
Erich Frauwallner
48
J W Haucr
57
Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya
63
Other Contributions
70
An Interpretation of the Meaning of Classical
154
prakrti gunas and satkaryavdda
166
Emergence and Functioning of the tatt
179
Discrimination and Release
201
Sankaras Criticism of Samkhya and
209
A Chart of the Twentyfive Principles of Classical
236
Appendix a Chronological Chart
251
A Modern Tradition of Samkhyayoga
278

Ancient Speculations
76
ProtoSamkhya Speculations
95
Classical Samkhya
134
Renaissance or Later Samkhva
152

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Page 7 - I. Because of the torment of the threefold suffering, (there arises) the desire to know the means of removing it. If (it is said that) this (desire — ie, inquiry) is useless because perceptible (means of removal are available), (we say) no, since (perceptible means) are not final or abiding.

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