Classical and Modern Interactions: Postmodern Architecture, Multiculturalism, Decline, and Other Issues

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University of Texas Press, Jan 1, 1992 - Architecture - 190 pages
Postmodernism, multiculturalism, the alleged decline of the United States, deconstruction, leadership, and values - these topics have been at the forefront of contemporary intellectual and cultural debate and are likely to remain so through the 1990s. Participants in the debate can usefully enlarge the perspective to a comparison between the Greco-Roman world and contemporary society. In this thought-provoking work, a noted classics scholar tests the ancient-modern comparison, showing what it can add to the contemporary debates and what its limitations are. Writing for intellectually adventurous readers, Galinsky explores Greece and Rome as multicultural societies, debates the merits of classicism in postmodern architecture, discusses the reign of Augustus in terms of modern leadership theories, and investigates the modern obsession with finding parallels between the supposed "decline and fall" of Rome and the "decay" of U.S. society. Within these discussions, Galinsky shows the continuing vitality of the classical tradition in the contemporary world. The Greek and Roman civilizations have provided us not only with models for conscious adaptation but also points for radical departures. This ability to change and innovate from classical models is crucial, Galinsky maintains. It creates a reciprocal process whereby contemporary issues are projected into the past while aspects of the ancient world are redefined in terms of current approaches. These essays result in a balanced assessment and stimulating restatement of some major issues in both contemporary U.S. society and the Greco-Roman world. The book, which speaks to a wide interdisciplinary audience, is based on a series of lecturesthat Galinsky gave as a national visiting scholar for Phi Beta Kappa. It concludes with a discussion of the role of classical studies in the United States today.
 

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Contents

Classicism in Postmodern American Architecture
1
The Conceptual Framework
9
Commercial Buildings
17
Campus Architecture
29
Large Public Buildings
39
Some Implications
48
Decadence
56
Immoderate Greatness and Imperial Overstretch
62
Short Bibliography and Suggestions for Further Reading
92
The Reign of Augustus
93
Ideology versus Pragmatism with an Ethos
99
Architecture and Art
106
Conclusion
114
Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Period
127
Rome
142
Multiculturalism Then and Now
150

Short Bibliography and Suggestions for Further Reading
70
Some Points of Convergence and Divergence
77
Aeneas and Modern Concepts of Masculinity
85
Short Bibliography and Suggestions for Further Reading
170
Index
185
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Page 177 - is applied rather to those who share our culture than to those who share a common blood.

About the author (1992)

Karl Galinsky is Floyd A. Cailloux Centennial Professor of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin.

Karl Galinsky is Floyd A. Cailloux Centennial Professor of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin.

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