Classroom Activators: More Than 100 Ways to Energize Learners

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SAGE Publications, Oct 30, 2008 - Education - 125 pages
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This handy guide puts a new twist on your teaching and training practices and shows how you can stimulate and invigorate learners through state-changing activities engaging techniques to help refocus the brain and create a receptive state of mind that enhances learning. Each section presents specific state-changing activities and the brain research behind them. While the strategies are geared for secondary classrooms, all can be adapted across grade levels. Classroom Activators illustrates how simple changes in delivering instruction or designing the classroom environment can help capture student interest and keep learners focused. The author examines state-changing activities within four categories: Energizing the Environment: examines ways to keep the learning environment fresh Getting Your Students' Attention: offers ideas to help students focus on the task at hand Energizing Your Students: presents techniques to use when the students may need a to refocus attention in the middle of a lesson Building Teams and Community: includes activities for community building, team building, and rapport building

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About the author (2008)

Jerry Evanski has been a teacher and school administrator at all levels K-12. He has written several books and has taught at the university level for many years. He has been conducting workshops for Discipline Associations and for The Teacher Learning Center for the past two decades. He created and teaches the Brain Research in Education certification program at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. The video he created about the program won two Telly Awards in 2005. He is also a trained facilitator for Super Camp, which is an internationally known accelerated learning program. His current research is focused on identifying and correcting potential visual, auditory, and kinesthetic blocks to learning. Evanski received his master’s degree in music education, his educational specialist and his doctorate degree in general administration and supervision from Wayne State University.

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