Classrooms under the influence: addicted families, addicted students

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Corwin Press, Jan 17, 1995 - Education - 152 pages
Addicts and addictive behavior are common in our classrooms at many levels. Addiction presents challenges, both personally and professionally, for which most educators are simply not prepared. To help educators help others, without becoming victims themselves, is the goal of Classrooms Under the Influence. Authors Powell, Zehm, and Kottler are themselves children of addicted parents. By combining personal experience with intellectual study, they have created an indispensable source of information about an issue not often covered in education courses. Classrooms Under the Influence explores how addiction affects behavior and the dynamics of the classroom for both the student and the teacher. The authors examine two important manifestations of the problem: cases in which the student is addicted and situations in which a student's life is affected by the addictions of relatives. Powell, Zehm, and Kottler recognize that teachers don't have the time nor the training to become social workers or counselors for their students. But they can be better trained to recognize emotional, social, family, and self-esteem problems. The authors present a series of do's and don'ts for dealing with various situations, and the building of trust and the development of relationships with students is an underlying theme. Through interviews and research, they isolate eleven challenges for educators and suggest workable strategies. Organizational changes that can help to maintain productive and healthy classroom environments are also discussed.

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Contents

Stories of Addiction
1
What Teachers Should
20
How Addiction Affects the
40
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Stanley J. Zehm was Professor and former Chair of Instructional and Curricular Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, prior to his death in 1999. He also worked as Adjunct Professor at Heritage College, where he had previously served as Dean of Education. He worked as both an elementary and secondary teacher for 15 years and as a counselor, and he held several administrative positions, including superintendent. He earned his doctorate in English education from Stanford University. He also possessed degrees and specialized training in philosophy, counseling, English, and theology. In addition to his experience in schools, he practiced as a family and child counselor. He was the author of numerous articles in professional journals, as well as several books for teachers and school administrators.

Jeffrey A. Kottler has authored over 65 books in the field for counselors, therapists, teachers, and the public, including COMPASSIONATE THERAPY: WORKING WITH DIFFICULT CLIENTS; ON BEING A THERAPIST; COUNSELORS FINDING THEIR WAY; MAKING CHANGES LAST; COUNSELING SKILLS FOR TEACHERS; DIVINE MADNESS: TEN STORIES OF CREATIVE STRUGGLE; BAD THERAPY: MASTER THERAPISTS SHARE THEIR WORST FAILURES; THE CLIENT WHO CHANGED ME: STORIES OF THERAPIST PERSONAL TRANSFORMATION; and THE MUMMY AT THE DINING ROOM TABLE: EMINENT THERAPISTS REVEAL THEIR MOST UNUSUAL CASES AND WHAT THEY TEACH US ABOUT HUMAN BEHAVIOR.
Jeffrey has worked as a teacher, counselor, and therapist in a preschool, middle school, mental health center, crisis center, university, community college, and private practice. He has served as a Fulbright Scholar and Senior Lecturer in Peru and Iceland, teaching counseling theory and practice. He has also served as a visiting professor in New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, and Nepal. He is currently Professor and Chair of the Counseling Department at California State University, Fullerton.