CliffsComplete Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Front Cover
Wiley, May 15, 2001 - Fiction - 192 pages
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In the CliffsComplete guides, the novel's complete text and a glossary appear side-by-side with coordinating numbered lines to help you understand unusual words and phrasing. You'll also find all the commentary and resources of a standard CliffsNotes for Literature.

CliffsComplete Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland   is revered as both a work of childhood whimsy and nonsense and as a satirical examination of the nature of language, Victorian morality, and the English legal system.

Embark on your own adventure through magical worlds and social commentary — and save yourself valuable studying time — all at once. Enhance your reading of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland with these additional features:

  •  A summary and insightful commentary for each chapter
  • Bibliography and historical background on the author, Lewis Carroll
  • A look at the historical context and structure of the novel
  • Discussions on the novel’s symbols and themes
  • A character map that graphically illustrates the relationships among the characters
  • Review questions, a quiz, discussion topics (essay questions), activity ideas
  • A Resource Center full of books, articles, films, and Internet sites

Streamline your literature study with all-in-one help from CliffsComplete guides!

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Contents

Down the RabbitHole
17
The Pool of Tears
30
A Caucus Race and Long Tale
40
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Born in Daresbury, England,in 1832, Charles Luthwidge Dodgson is better known by his pen mane of Lewis Carroll. He became a minister of the Church of England and a lecturer in mathematics at Christ Church College, Oxford. He was the author, under his own name, of An Elementary Treatise on Determinants (1867), Symbolic Logic (1896), and other scholarly treatises which would hardly have given him a place in English literature. Charles Dodgson might have been completely forgotten but for the work of his alter ego, Lewis Carroll. Lewis Carroll, shy in the company of adults, loved children and knew and understood the world of the imagination in which the most sensitive of them lived. So he put the little girl Alice Liddell into a dream-story and found himself famous as the author of Alice in Wonderland (1865). Through the Looking Glass followed in 1871. In recent years Carroll has been taken quite seriously as a major literary artist for adults as well. His works have come under the scrutiny of critics who have explained his permanent attractiveness in terms of existential and symbolic drama: The Alice books dramatize psychological realities in symbolic terms, being commentary on the nature of the human predicament rather than escape from it. In addition to his writing, Carroll was also a pioneering photographer, and he took many pictures of young children, especially girls, with whom he seemed to empathize.

Bibliographic information