Climate Change and National Security: A Country-Level Analysis

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Daniel Moran
Georgetown University Press, Mar 22, 2011 - Political Science - 320 pages
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In this unique and innovative contribution to environmental security, an international team of scholars explore and estimate the intermediate-term security risks that climate change may pose for the United States, its allies and partners, and for regional and global order through the year 2030. In profiles of forty-two key countries and regions, each contributor considers the problems that climate change will pose for existing institutions and practices. By focusing on the conduct of individual states or groups of nations, the results add new precision to our understanding of the way environmental stress may be translated into political, social, economic, and military challenges in the future.

Countries and regions covered in the book include China, Vietnam, The Philippines, Indonesia, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Central Asia, the European Union, the Persian Gulf, Egypt, Turkey, the Maghreb, West Africa, Southern Africa, the Northern Andes, and Brazil.

 

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Contents

Climate Science and Climate Politics
1
2 China
9
3 Vietnam
27
4 The Philippines
43
5 Indonesia
59
6 India
73
7 Pakistan
85
8 Bangladesh
103
14 Egypt
177
Algeria Libya Morocco and Tunisia
189
Côte dIvoire Nigeria and Senegal
203
The Mano River Union Guinea Liberia and Sierra Leone
221
Lesotho South Africa Swaziland and Zimbabwe
233
Bolivia Colombia Ecuador and Peru
247
20 Brazil
259
The Politics of Uncertainty
269

9 Russia
115
Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan
129
11 The European Union
141
12 Turkey
153
Bahrain Iran Iraq Kuwait Qatar Saudi Arabia the United Arab Emirates and Oman
163
Appendixes
275
List of Contributors
285
Index
287
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About the author (2011)

Daniel Moran is a professor of national security affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. He is coeditor of Energy Security and Global Politics: The Militarization of Resource Management.

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