Clinical Excerpts, Volume 15

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Excerpts from various medical journals recommending the use of certain pharmaceutical products.
 

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Page 70 - It prevents the spread of the disease to adjacent parts. "2. It does not injure the epithelial covering, and thus it tends to limit the infection to the superficial areas. "3. It removes more germs and pus cells than either astringents or disinfectants can destroy. It acts in the same way as constant irrigation, both in aborting and arresting the progress of the infection. "4. It can be used more frequently than astringents or strong germicides, so that the parts can practically be kept free...
Page 163 - For the treatment of boils all that is necessary is a small piece of stick sharpened to a fine point, a little absorbent cotton, a 95 per cent solution of carbolic acid, and a 5 or 10 per cent ointment of salicylic acid. As soon as the boil has pointed, and it has usually done so when the patient comes to us, a small bit of the cotton is wound about the pointed stick, dipped in the carbolic acid, and bored into the softened point of the boil. This gives a chance for the pus to escape, and thoroughly...
Page 163 - ... linen cloth, or several thicknesses of gauze, laid over the boil and the adjacent region. That is the end of that boil, as a rule. If it is a very large boil, the operation may have to be repeated the next day. The ointment is to be kept constantly on the affected part for a week. Of course, a few...
Page 12 - Examination shows points of tenderness along the course of the nerve on the inner side of the arm at the elbow and over the deltoid. There is also a point of tenderness between the scapulae about at the level of the second or third dorsal vertebra. This is very painful and is characteristic. Stretching out the arm and drawing upon the brachial plexus brings out pain, just as it does in the extension of the hip in sciatica. Later there is also weakness of response to the elbow jerk, just as in the...
Page 136 - Adjunct Professor of Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System, New York PostGraduate Medical School and Hospital; and William A. White, MD, Superintendent of St.
Page 231 - When convalescence is once fairly established the use of tonics is indicated. Every rheumatic child suffers more or less from blood impoverishment. In the very acute cases, anemia is so severe and sudden that the demand for treatment is urgent. I am quite in favor of an early though gradual return to the usual diet, and it is my habit to proceed as follows: After the restrictions as indicated previously, when the temperature touches normal, I begin the use of legumes, undextrinized cereals and some...
Page 223 - Meals are best taken dnrh1g those periods when the body is at rest. The time for taking food must not be too short. During the meal it is better not to think of business, or serious or perhaps even sad things. Our whole and undivided attention should be given to our meals. Pleasant company, light conversation, jokes, and stories add to the enjoyment of food.
Page 163 - Of course, a few boils may appear for a few days in the region, the result of the infection of the skin follicles before this treatment was instituted. They are to be treated in the same way, and a cure will soon be attained. If a patient...
Page 230 - The pathological indications are: (a) To combat the inflammation in the joints. This may be done by the stimulation of the cutaneous circulation. Along this line, the hot-blanket pack and hot fomentations are used until the temperature falls or the acute pain is relieved. (b) To limit or prevent an extension to the heart, lungs, pleura or meninges. Here is the place for elimination. Skin, kidneys, and bowel must be kept active. Warm baths followed by cool sponging or friction over the parts of the...
Page 231 - I believe that it is most important that we give to the convalescent child a diet which is as nutritious as possible and no doubt much of our prolonged convalescence was formerly due to the restriction of the diet for weeks after an attack. My reasons for this are given later on. Sugar seems to me to be the most harmful article and its use is always restricted irrespective of the prevailing condition. The salicylates occupy a well-deserved place in the treatment of rheumatism. They are palliative...

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