Clinical Treatises on the Symptomatology and Diagnosis of Disorders of Respiration and Circulation: Bradycardia and tachycardia

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Page 112 - ... pulse, which generally ranged at the rate of 30 in a minute. Mr. Duggan informed me that he had been in almost continual attendance on this gentleman for the last seven years, and that during that period he had seen him, he is quite certain, in not less than twenty apoplectic attacks. Before each of them he was observed, for a day or two, heavy and lethargic, with loss of memory. He would then fall down in a state of complete insensibility, and was on several occasions hurt by the fall. When...
Page 111 - But he was oppressed by stupor, having a constant disposition to sleep, and still a very troublesome cough. What most attracted my attention was, the irregularity of his breathing, and remarkable slowness of the pulse, which generally ranged at the rate of 30 in a minute. Mr. Duggan informed me that he had been in almost continual attendance on this gentleman for the last seven years ; and that during that period he had seen him, he is quite certain, in not less than twenty apoplectic attacks. Before...
Page 112 - ... state of complete insensibility, and was on several occasions hurt by the fall. When they attacked him, his pulse would become even slower than usual, his breathing loudly stertorous. He was bled without loss of time, and the most active purgative medicines were exhibited. As a preventive measure, a large issue was inserted in the neck, and a spare regimen was directed for him. He recovered from these attacks without any paralysis. (Edema of the feet and ankles came on early in December ; his...
Page 112 - The left ventricle was very thin and its whole surface was covered with a layer of fat. Beneath this the muscular structure was not a line in thickness...
Page 7 - Clinical Treatises on the Symptomatology and Diagnosis of Disorders* of Respiration and Circulation. By Prof. EDMUND VON NEUSSER, MD, Professor of the Second Medical Clinic, Vienna; Associate Editor, Nothnagel's Practice of Medicine.
Page 113 - ... a section of it exhibited more the appearance of liver than of a heart. The septum of the ventricles presented the same appearance. In both ventricles, even in the lining fibres, yellow spots, where fat had occupied the place of muscular structure, were to be observed. The whole organ was remarkably light; the valves were all sound, except those of the aorta, which were studded with specks of bone, but elsewhere were cartilaginous and elastic, from which they derived a disposition to remain closed;...
Page 9 - Neusser has done well to bring together so ably all the factors involved in the decrease and increase of the cardiac action and to emphasize the fact that the study of the cardiac phases is no unimportant part of the work of every physician.
Page 111 - ... full habit of body, had for a long time been incapable of any exertion, as he was subject to oppression of his breathing and continued cough. In May 1819, in conjunction with his ordinary medical attendant, Mr. Duggan, I saw this gentleman : he was just then recovering from the effects of an apoplectic attack, which had suddenly seized him three days before. He was well enough to be about his house, and even to go out. But he was oppressed by stupor, having a constant disposition to sleep, and...
Page 9 - The modern work in laboratories upon infections has thrown into the background the consideration of disorders of many of the vital organs." The heart as the fans et origo of the circulation must be seriously considered in practically every disease and its condition is many times the most reliable index of the result and best indicates the progress of the affection.
Page 111 - I saw this gentleman : he was just then recovering from the effects of an apoplectic attack, which had suddenly seized him three days before. He was well enough to be about his house, and even to go out. But he was oppressed by stupor, having a constant disposition to sleep, and still a very troublesome cough. What most attracted my attention was, the irregularity of his breathing, and remarkable slowness of the pulse, which generally ranged at the rate of 30 in a minute. Mr. Duggan informed me that...

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