Clinical Laboratory Methods: A Manual of Technique and Morphology Designed for the Use of Students and Practitioners of Medicine

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D. Appleton, 1916 - Diagnosis, Laboratory - 343 pages
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Page 47 - With the aid of heat dissolve the carbonate, citrate and thiocyanate in enough water to make about 800 cc of the mixture and filter if necessary. Dissolve the copper sulphate separately in about 100 cc of water and pour the solution slowly into the other liquid, with constant stirring. Add the ferrocyanide solution, cool and dilute to exactly 1 liter.
Page 121 - This gives the monosodium or acid salt. which is red in color, and which is slightly irritant locally when injected. It is necessary, therefore, to add 0.15 cc more of the * bydroxid, a quantity sufficient to change the color to a beautiful Bordeaux red. This preparation is non-irritant...
Page 243 - Its solution contains a large number of hydroxyl ions, and it is, therefore, a very strong base. It is, however, not quite as strongly dissociated as the hydroxides of the alkalies. When a clear solution of calcium hydroxide is allowed to stand exposed to the air for a short time, it takes up carbon dioxide from the air, forming flakes of the insoluble calcium carbonate...
Page 221 - In the majority of cases the sputum is characteristic and of two types: (1) glairy, mucilaginous, often quite watery; (2) purulent, more or less bloody, more or less — sometimes intensely — fetid. Both types may be found sparingly or in abundance. The second type may only have a characteristic, homogeneous, pinkish color, or be deeply blood-stained; it generally has a distinctly bad odor. This odor may belong in some degree to both kinds of sputum, but especially to the purulent form. Of eight...
Page 47 - ... flame until the carbonate has entirely dissolved. The diluted urine is now run in from the burette, rather rapidly until a chalk-white precipitate forms, and the blue color of the mixture begins to lessen perceptibly, after which the solution from the burette must be run in a few drops at a time, until the disappearance of the last trace of blue color, which marks the end-point. The solution must be kept vigorously boiling throughout the entire titration.
Page 164 - ... it to a 50 cc volumetric flask and dilute it to the 50 cc mark with the phosphate-chloride solution . Mix the fecal extract thoroughly by shaking and determine its amylolytic activity: For this purpose a series of six graduated tubes is prepared, containing volumes of the extract ranging from 2.5 cc to 0.078 cc Each of the intermediate tubes in this series will thus contain one-half as much fluid as the preceding tube. Now make the contents of each tube 2.
Page 163 - ... 2 cc at a time, rubbing the feces mixture to a homogeneous consistency after each addition of the extraction medium. Permit the mixture to stand at room temperature for a half-hour with frequent stirring. We now have a neutral fecal suspension. Transfer this...
Page 164 - ... solution. Mix the fecal extract thoroughly by shaking and determine its amylolytic activity. For this purpose a series of six graduated tubes is prepared, containing volumes of the extract ranging from 2.5 cc to 0.078 cc Each of the intermediate tubes in this series will thus contain one-half as much fluid as the preceding tube. Now make the contents of each tube 2 . 5 cc by means of the phosphate-chloride solution in order to secure a uniform electrolyte concentration.
Page 88 - After adding three drops of a 1 per cent. solution of phenolphthalein to 25 cc of pure alcohol, the latter is brought to the neutral point. The ether extract from the separating funnel is now added to the neutralized alcohol, and its acidity is determined by titrating with N-20 potassium hydrate solution (alcoholic).
Page 165 - ... a 1 per cent starch solution in twenty-four hours at 38 C. Inasmuch as stools vary so greatly as to water content, it is essential to an accurate comparison of stools that such comparison be made on the basis of the solid matter. Supposing, for example, that in the above determination we had 6.2 cc of sediment. Since the supernatant fluid was removed and made up to 50 cc before testing its amylolytic value, it is evident that 1 cc of this sediment is equivalent to 8.1 cc of extract. Therefore,...

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