Clive Barker's Collected Best Hellraiser, Volume 1

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Checker Book Publishing Group, 2002 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 230 pages
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Neil Gaiman and Alex Ross are among the heavyweights who contributed to this landmark comicbook anthology based on the horror classic, Hellraiser, which ran from 1989 to 1993. Featuring short stories in the Hellraiser millieu written and illustrated by the leading lights in the comic book industry, this series shocked and entertained millions of comics and Clive Barker fans. Checker Book Publishing collects for the first time the best of these short stories into a single full-color trade paperback collection. A must have for Hellraiser, Clive Barker and quality comics fans
 

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About the author (2002)

Alex Ross was born in 1968. He attended St. Alban's School in Washington, D.C. and graduated from Harvard University in 1990. It was there that he studied under composer Peter Lieberson and was a D.J. on the classical and underground rock departments of the college radio station. He earned a Harvard A.B. in English summa cum laude for a thesis on James Joyce. From the years, 1992-1996, Alex Ross was a music critic at the New York Times. He also wrote for the New Republic, Slate, and The London Review of Books. In 1993 he started contributing to The New Yorker and became a staff writer in 1996. In 2007 his released his first book in the U.S. entitled The Rest is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century, a cultural history of music since 1900. This book received widespread crritical praise in the U.S. and earned a National Book Critics Circle Award, a spot on New York Times list of the ten best books of 2007, and a finalist citation for the Pulitzer Prize in general non-fiction. His second book - Listen to This- was published in September 2010. Alex Ross has also received a Holtzbrink fellowship at the American Academy in Berlin.

Critics of the horror story have frequently called Clive Barker the "British Stephen King". Born in Liverpool in 1952, Barker attended the University of Liverpool but moved to London in 1977, where he worked as a commercial artist and became involved with the avant-garde theatrical community. Primarily a playwright during this period, he also produced short fiction that he would eventually publish as part of his six-volume collection titled Books of Blood (1984-85). More than any other author of contemporary horror fiction, Barker has had a major impact on the direction of the genre. He has introduced strong elements of sex and graphic violence into his fiction, but these elements are employed with an artistic objective. Barker underscores his work with complex subtextual metaphors and artistic allusions. Preoccupied with the craft of writing and with its effect on the reader, Barker is an innovator of formula and genre, often parodying the former in order to change the philosophical contour of the latter. Barker has achieved commercial success not only with his short fiction but also with his novels, which tend to be epic in scope and to blend elements of horror with those of high fantasy. Barker is one of the more influential voices in horror cinema, having written and directed a number of films. His printed works include The Candle in the Cloud, Absolute Midnight, The Scarlet Gospels, and Black is the Devil's Rainbow: Tales of a Journeyman. His films include Dread, Tortured Souls: Animae Damanatae, and Hellraiser.

Neil Gaiman was born in Portchester, England on November 10, 1960. He worked as a journalist and freelance writer for a time, before deciding to try his hand at comic books. Some of his work has appeared in publications such as Time Out, The Sunday Times, Punch, and The Observer. His first comic endeavor was the graphic novel series The Sandman. The series has won every major industry award including nine Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, three Harvey Awards, and the 1991 World Fantasy Award for best short story, making it the first comic ever to win a literary award. He writes both children and adult books. His adult books include The Ocean at the End of the Lane, which won a British National Book Awards, and the Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel for 2014; Stardust, which won the Mythopoeic Award as best novel for adults in 1999; American Gods, which won the Hugo, Nebula, Bram Stoker, SFX, and Locus awards; Anansi Boys; Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances; and The View from the Cheap Seats: Selected Nonfiction, which is a New York Times Bestseller. His children's books include The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish; Coraline, which won the Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla, the BSFA, the Hugo, the Nebula, and the Bram Stoker awards; The Wolves in the Walls; Odd and the Frost Giants; The Graveyard Book, which won the Newbery Award in 2009 and The Sandman: Overture which won the 2016 Hugo Awards Best Graphic Story.

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