Clown Girl: A Novel

Front Cover
Hawthorne Books, 2007 - Fiction - 297 pages
10 Reviews
Clown Girl lives in Baloneytown, a seedy neighborhood where drugs, balloon animals, and even rubber chickens contribute to the local currency. Against a backdrop of petty crime, she struggles to live her dreams, calling on cultural masters Charlie Chaplin, Kafka, and da Vinci for inspiration. In an effort to support herself and her layabout performance-artist boyfriend, Clown Girl finds herself unwittingly transformed into a "corporate clown," trapping herself in a cycle of meaningless, high-paid gigs that veer dangerously close to prostitution. Monica Drake has created a novel that riffs on the high comedy of early film stars — most notably Chaplin and W. C. Fields — to raise questions of class, gender, economics, and prejudice. Resisting easy classification, this debut novel blends the bizarre, the humorous, and the gritty with stunning skill.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - yougotamber - LibraryThing

Tried reading this twice and couldn't finish it, rubbish and I'm confused why Pahalniuk gave such a great introduction for her. He talked her up and she fell way short. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - keneumey - LibraryThing

A brilliant and hilarious book. I know that not everyone shares my sense of humor, but I disagree strongly with most of these negative reviews. Especially those that say Clown Girl just limps around ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
ix
1
17
2
29
3
39
4
45
5
59
6
69
7
85
13
169
14
183
15
189
16
203
17
219
18
239
19
247
20
259

8
97
9
111
10
123
11
137
12
149
21
267
22
279
23
289
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Monica Drake has an MFA from the University of Arizona and teaches at the Pacific Northwest College of Art. She is a contributor of reviews and articles to The Oregonian, The Stranger, and the Portland Mercury and her fiction has appeared in the Beloit Fiction Review, Threepenny Review, The Insomniac Reader, and others. She has been the recipient of an Arizona Commission on the Arts Award, the Alligator Juniper Prize in Fiction, a Millay Colony Fellowship, and was a Tennessee Williams scholar at Sewanee Writers Workshop.

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