Coastal Navigation Using GPS: For Sail and Power

Front Cover
Sheridan House, Inc., 2003 - Sports & Recreation - 290 pages
GPS has forever transformed the art of navigation, but most sailors don't know how to use it effectively. This new handbook from Frank Larkin, a Master Mariner with over 30 years of boating experience and the author of the hugely successful Basic Coastal Navigation, serves as an invaluable guide to this essential device. Larkin merges basic GPS techniques with tried and true principles of coastal navigation, making for a truly comprehensive tutorial. Clearly written and easily understood, with an intuitive layout and simple instructions, the book guides readers through the maze of GPS options, focusing on simple GPS navigation procedures and presenting a set of criteria for selecting a GPS set appropriate for each sailor's individual needs. Suitable for both sail and power boats, this fully illustrated book covers all aspects of coastal navigation and is highly recommended for self-study and reference as well as navigation classrooms. Eight appendices are included, covering everything from maintenance and installation of your GPS unit to sorting and implementing GPS data.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Review

Contents

Four
16
Seven
40
Eight
54
Twelve
128
The Height of the Tide at Any Time
197
OneQuarterOneTenth Rule
204
The Rule of Twelves
211
Fourteen Compensating Your Course
216
Appendix One How to Check the Installation Accuracy
246
Appendix Four How to Develop Data for a Deviation Table
253
Appendix Six How to Develop a Speed Curve
260
Appendix Seven Navigation Forms
266
Appendix Eight Coast Guard Districts and Addresses
275
Index
283
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Frank J. Larkin is a writer and Master Mariner with over 30 years of boating experience. He works as an instructor of boat safety and navigation techniques, and is constantly looking for new ways to refine the small boat navigation process. He lives in the Boston area, and can often be found on the waters of Massachusetts Bay.

Bibliographic information