Coasts: Form, Process and Evolution

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 - Science - 623 pages
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Coasts are some of the most rapidly changing places on earth. Understanding the natural adjustments that occur between coastal landforms and the processes that influence them is essential for the better management of coastal resources. Coasts provides a necessary background in geomorphology for those studying coastal systems. It describes the landforms that occur on the coast, their responses to the processes that shape them, and the pattern of evolution that can be determined for different types of coast over thousands of years. Numerous examples from around the world are used to illustrate the variety of environments. Particular attention is paid to coastal morphodynamics, the co-adjustment of process and form, on rocky, reef, sandy, deltaic-estuarine and muddy coasts. This valuable text for advanced undergraduate and graduate students is well illustrated and contains an extensive reference section. It will also be of great interest to environmental scientists, geologists, coastal managers and planners.
 

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Contents

Geological setting and materials
36
Coastal processes 90
89
Rocky coasts
143
Reef coasts
189
Beach and barrier coasts
248
Deltas and estuaries
321
vii
326
Muddy coasts
378
Morphodynamics of coastal systems
435
Human activities and future coasts
476
References
498
Index
617
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Page 524 - Geological Observations on Coral Reefs, Volcanic Islands, and on South America : being the Geology of the Voyage of the "Beagle,

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About the author (2002)

Colin Woodroffe is Associate Professor at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales. His previous book Coastal Evolution (052141976X), co-edited by Bill Carter, was published by Cambridge in 1994.

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