Coded Encounters: Writing, Gender, and Ethnicity in Colonial Latin America

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Francisco J. Cevallos Candau
Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1994 - History - 298 pages
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Much has been written about the ways in which Columbus's "discovery" of America began a process of inventing a new world in European consciousness. But far less has been published about those on the margins of the dominant European discourse--Amerindians, Africans, and women--whose experience is reflected in documents written during the early years of European rule in Latin America. This volume brings together essays by leading scholars of colonial Latin America who address a series of topics relating to both the marginal and European-dominant discourses.

The book is divided into five sections: "Representing the New World," "The Institutionalization of the Colony," "Amerindian Texts," "Women in Colonial Latin America," and "The Later Colony and the Caribbean Experience." The essays range from a consideration of Amerindian codes of mapmaking to the career of a transvestite nun, from confessional "sin lists" used by priests to examine the transgressions of their American charges to a new view of colonial women's lives based on birth records, dowry agreements, and wills.

Contributors include Walter Mignolo, Maureen Ahern, Abel Alves, Rolena Adorno, Lúcia Helena Santiago Costigan, Pedro Lasarte, Raquel Chang-Rodríguez, Regina Harrison, Asunción Lavrin, Stephanie Merrim, Nina M. Scott, Antonio Carreño, Julie Greer Johnson, Karen Stolley, and Antonio Benítez-Rojo.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Geographical Discourses and Territoriality During the Expansion of the Spanish Empire
15
The Relatione della navigatione scoperta by Fernando de Alarcon 1540
46
Images of the Raw and the Refined in the SixteenthCentury Conquest of New Spain
62
Peaceful Conquest and Law in the Relación Account of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca
75
The Satirical Poetry of Gregorio de Matos and Juan del Valle y Caviedes
87
Carnival Necromancy and Political Subversion
101
Depiction in Atau Wallpaj Puchukakuyninpa Wankan or Tragedy of Atahualpas Death
115
From Anomaly to Icon
177
Sor Juanas Foremothers in La Respuesta a Sor Filotea
206
Analogy in the Baroque Lyric from Gongora to Sor Juana
224
Satire and EighteenthCentury Colonial SpanishAmerican Society
239
Guide for Travelers in EighteenthCentury Spanish America
247
Cirilo Villaverde the Seeker of Origins
255
Bibliography
263
Contributors
287

Spanish Quechua Confessional Manuals in the Andes
135
Women in Colonial Historical Sources
153

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Page 1 - Broken spears lie in the roads; we have torn our hair in our grief. The houses are roofless now, and their walls are red with blood. Worms are swarming in the streets and plazas, and the walls are splattered with gore. The water has turned red, as if it were dyed, and when we drink it it has the taste of brine.

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About the author (1994)

Francisco Javier Cevallos-Candau and Nina M. Scott are professors of Spanish at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Jeffrey A. Cole is director of the Center for International Programs at Virginia Commonwealth University. Nicomedes Suárez-Araúz teaches Spanish at Smith College.

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