Coercion, Conversion and Counterinsurgency in Louis XIV's France

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BRILL, 2007 - History - 265 pages
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This is a study of the domestic application of armed coercion during the reign of Louis XIV. It examines the coercive aspects of tax collection, the royal response to tax revolts, and the use of force to convert the king s Protestant subjects and to wage a devastating counterinsurgency campaign against Protestant rebels in the mountains and plains of Languedoc. Relying heavily on archival sources, the study demonstrates that both the coercive inclination of Louis XIV and the coercive capabilities of the French army have been overstated. This raises questions about some common assumptions regarding the role of the army in the projection of state power and its contribution to the process of state formation in Early Modern France.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Coercion and Tax Collection Under Louis XIV
11
Chapter Two The Response to Popular Revolt 16621670
53
The Revolts of 1675
79
Religious Coercion Under Louis XIV
125
Chapter Five The Revolt of the Camisards 17021704
181
Conclusion
243
Bibliography
253
Index
263
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About the author (2007)

Roy L. McCullough, Ph.D. (2005) in History, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, is a Project Manager with the Defense Policy Analysis division of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) in Mclean, Virginia.

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