Cognitive Behavioural Therapy with Older People: Interventions for Those With and Without Dementia

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Jessica Kingsley Publishers, May 15, 2010 - Psychology - 256 pages
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The development of 'ageless' mental health services means that an increasing number of clinicians are now required to work with older people. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is recognised by all recent meta-analyses as the most effective therapy, yet few clinicians are trained specifically in its usage with the elderly. This book is a detailed guide to using CBT with older people both with and without cognitive difficulties. Reviewing its use in different settings, it covers both conceptual and practical perspectives, and details everything from causes and initial assessment to case formulation and change techniques. Case studies in both depression and dementia are used to illustrate how CBT should work and how positive effects can manifest themselves. Suitable both for trainees and experienced therapists, this book will be essential for anybody using cognitive behavioural therapy in their work with older people, regardless of their clients' levels of cognitive ability.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction
11
PART I
15
PART II
55
PART III
123
APPENDIX I DISORDERSPECIFIC CONCEPTUAL MODELS
202
APPENDIX II CTSR TRAINING MANUAL FOR PROMOTING THERAPEUTIC COMPETENCE
207

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About the author (2010)

Ian Andrew James is Head of Newcastle Challenging Behaviour Service and Consultant Clinical Psychologist for Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Trust. Having graduated in Psychology from the University of Aberdeen, he undertook a PhD in cognitive psychology at Lancaster University. After completing his clinical training at Newcastle University, he spent four years at Newcastle Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies Centre, undertaking work on therapeutic competence. Ian Andrew James has published extensively in the field of mental health, training and clinical supervision, and is a regular speaker at national and international conferences. He is a lecturer on the Clinical Psychology course at Newcastle University, and now focuses on applying therapy to people with dementia.

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