Cognitive Load Theory

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Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 7, 2011 - Education - 274 pages
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Over the last 25 years, cognitive load theory has become one of the world’s leading theories of instructional design. It is heavily researched by many educational and psychological researchers and is familiar to most practicing instructional designers, especially designers using computer and related technologies.

The theory can be divided into two aspects that closely inter-relate and influence each other: human cognitive architecture and the instructional designs and prescriptions that flow from that architecture. The cognitive architecture is based on biological evolution. The resulting description of human cognitive architecture is novel and accordingly, the instructional designs that flow from the architecture also are novel. All instructional procedures are routinely tested using randomized, controlled experiments.

Roughly 1/3 of the book will be devoted to cognitive architecture and its evolutionary base with 2/3 devoted to the instructional implications that follow, including technology-based instruction. Researchers, teachers and instructional designers need the book because of the explosion of interest in cognitive load theory over the last few years. The theory is represented in countless journal articles but a detailed, modern overview presenting the theory and its implications in one location is not available.

 

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A big problem with this book is that it repeats most statements up to five times on a single page. So you need to skim it and it's a rather unpleasant way to read a book.

Contents

Categories of Knowledge An Evolutionary Approach
3
Amassing Information The Information Store Principle
17
Acquiring Information The Borrowing and Reorganising Principle and the Randomness as Genesis Principle
26
Interacting with the External Environment The Narrow Limits of Change Principle and the Environmental Organising
39
Intrinsic and Extraneous Cognitive Load
57
Measuring Cognitive Load
70
The GoalFree Effect
87
The Worked Example and Problem Completion Effects
99
The Redundancy Effect
141
The Expertise Reversal Effect
155
The Guidance Fading Effect
171
Facilitating Effective Mental Processes The Imagination and SelfExplanation Effects
183
The Element Interactivity Effect
193
Altering Element Interactivity and Intrinsic Cognitive load
202
Emerging Themes in Cognitive Load Theory The Transient Information and the Collective Working Memory Effects
219
Cognitive Load Theory in Perspective
235

The SplitAttention Effect
111
The Modality Effect
129
References
243
Copyright

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