Cognitive Science, Literature, and the Arts: A Guide for Humanists

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 244 pages
By sharing one of the longest land borders in the world, the United States and Mexico will always have a special relationship. In the early twenty-first century, they are as important to one another as ever before with a vital trade partnership and often-tense migration positions. The ideal introduction to U.S.-Mexican relations, this book moves from conflicts all through the nineteenth century up to contemporary democratic elections in Mexico. Dom̕nguez and Ferǹndez de Castro deftly trace the path of the relationship between these North American neighbors from bloody conflicts to (wary) partnership. By covering immigration, drug trafficking, NAFTA, democracy, environmental problems, and economic instability, the second edition of The United States and Mexico provides a thorough look back and an informed vision of the future.
 

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Contents

Why Cognitive Science Now?
1
Thinking Jazz
7
Is It Cognitive Science Yet? Some Basic Principles
29
Maestros and Geniuses
59
Where the Metaphors Are
87
Narrative or Getting the Story Straight
115
How Literature Makes Us Feel
140
Art Empathy and the Brain
166
Blindness and Insight in the Explanation of Art and Mind
191
Notes
219
Works Cited
227
Index
235
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Patrick Colm Hogan is Professor of English and Comparative literature at the University of Connecticut.His many books include The Culture of Conformism, PhilosophicalApproaches to the Study of Literature, Colonialism andCultural Identity, and The Politics of Interpretation.

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